News

Lia Thomas Teammate: Locker Room ‘Definitely Awkward’ Because Thomas’ Male Genitalia Exposed

“Lia still has male body parts and is still attracted to women.”

   DailyWire.com
Lia Thomas of the Pennsylvania Quakers gets ready to compete in a freestyle event during a tri-meet against the Yale Bulldogs and the Dartmouth Big Green at Sheerr Pool on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania on January 8, 2022 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Hunter Martin/Getty Images

A teammate of Lia Thomas on the University of Pennsylvania women’s swim team told the The Daily Mail that the locker room she shares with Thomas is “definitely awkward because Lia still has male body parts and is still attracted to women.”

The Daily Mail report includes that the anonymous teammate stated that although Thomas’ male genitalia are often covered by a towel, there have been a number of times Thomas’ nudity has been revealed, exposing the genitalia for the women on the team to glimpse and making them feel uncomfortable.

Thomas has told teammates of having dated women, The Daily Mail reported.

The anonymous teammate purportedly charged that women on the team have articulated their concern with the coach, Mike Schnur, in order to get Thomas barred from the locker room, but to no avail.

She stated:

Multiple swimmers have raised it, multiple different times. But we were basically told that we could not ostracize Lia by not having her in the locker room and that there’s nothing we can do about it, that we basically have to roll over and accept it, or we cannot use our own locker room. … It’s really upsetting because Lia doesn’t seem to care how it makes anyone else feel. The 35 of us are just supposed to accept being uncomfortable in our own space and locker room for, like, the feelings of one.

The school was so focused on making sure Lia was okay, and doing everything they possibly could do for her, that they didn’t even think about the rest of us. It just seems like the women who built this program and the people who were here before Lia don’t matter. And it’s frustrating because Lia doesn’t really seem to be bothered by all the attention, not at all. Actually she seems like she enjoys it. It’s affected all of us way more than it’s affected her.

The teammate told The Daily Mail she had discussed with her teammates possibly launching a protest at a swim meet, but the consensus was they would be putting themselves at risk. She stated, “We’ve all tried to think of anything we could do, but I just don’t know what we could do that wouldn’t basically have us not be swimming. We already lost a year due to covid and people don’t want to put their own swim careers on hold.”

Last Saturday, after Lia Thomas won two more events against female swimmers on Saturday, one teammate who preferred to remain anonymous spoke out, saying, “Women are now third-class citizens.” Thomas won the 100-yard and 200-yard freestyle races in the meet against Harvard University.

The anonymous teammate told The Washington Examiner, “Lia was not even close to being competitive as a man in the 50 and the 100. But just because Lia is biologically a man, [Lia] is just naturally better than many females in the 50 and the 100 or anything that [Lia] wasn’t good at as a man.”

On January 8, Thomas swam a race in which Thomas’ time was suspiciously slower than previous times, permitting Iszac Henig, a Yale swimmer who is biologically female but identifies as male, to win.

That prompted a young woman who is on Penn’s swim team with Thomas to surmise in an interview with Outkick that Thomas and Henig had colluded before the race in order for Henig to win and thus disprove the assumption that Thomas, as a biological male, could not be beaten by a biological female competitor.

In early December, Thomas utterly crushed the women competing with Thomas at the University of Akron’s Zippy Invitational, winning the 1650 free by a gargantuan 38 seconds ahead of the young woman finishing second, winning the 500 free by a whopping twelve seconds ahead of the woman finishing second, and winning the 200 free by a still-huge seven seconds, setting new Penn records along with meet and pool records.