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In The Wake Of Tragedy, Dana Loesch Lays Out The Six Questions Everyone Should Be Asking

   DailyWire.com
A man reads "Hands off my gun" written by the NRA Spokeperson Dana Loesch in Washington DC on February 8, 2018. Each time there's another mass shooting in the United States, Shannon Watts and Dana Loesch take to Twitter on opposite ends of the gun debate. Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, makes the arguments for stricter gun control in a country with 33,000 gun-related deaths a year. Loesch, spokeswoman for the National Rifle Association (NRA) and a conservative radio host, lays out the case for why Americans need weapons for self-defense. The two women have become two of the most prominent public faces of the gun control debate with hundreds of thousands of followers across the United States. / AFP PHOTO / Eric BARADAT (Photo credit should read ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images)
ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images

Nationally syndicated radio host Dana Loesch responded to the tragic school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, by laying out the six questions people should be asking if they were truly interested in finding solutions.

And in addition to outlining the questions people should be asking, she pointed out the fact that politicians were not asking them.

“Not a single politician is asking: 1) How did this murderer get into the school? 2) What security did this school have and how can we protect schools like we protect our concerts, banks, museums? 3) WHERE WERE HIS PARENTS AND THE ADULTS IN HIS LIFE?” Loesch began.

“4) How did he buy a handgun? 5) Did he pass a background check? 6) No one in his house saw what was going on?” she continued.

“These are the questions asked by people who not only want answers, but solutions,” Loesch added before pivoting to comment on the things President Joe Biden did elect to mention when he addressed the nation Tuesday evening.

Biden, after briefly touching on the grief and pain being felt by friends and family members in the wake of the shooting, turned his ire on the “gun lobby,” called for a ban on “assault weapons,” and warned his political opposition against standing in the way of “commons sense gun laws” going forward.

But Loesch pointed out, “The gun lobby’ didn’t head his household, the ‘gun lobby’ didn’t neglect to monitor his behavior, the ‘gun lobby’ didn’t neglect to secure the school, the ‘gun lobby’ didn’t leave any doors unlocked, and the ‘gun lobby’ didn’t tell him to murder anyone.”

“If you’re going to insanely blame someone for the actions of an 18 year-old criminal who lived at home and dropped out of school, START IN THE HOME and not the millions of law abiding people who carry every single day without issue,” Loesch concluded.

Loesch traces her fierce defense of the Second Amendment back to age 12 — when she watched her grandfather sit on the porch, rifle in hand, ready to defend the family against her aunt’s estranged and violent husband. “I never want anyone to feel the fear that I felt that night,” she told CU Boulder students during a 2019 appearance.