Gavin Newsom: Coronavirus Pandemic ‘Opportunity’ To Implement Leftist Agenda

   DailyWire.com
California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a news conference with California attorney General Xavier Becerra at the California State Capitol on August 16, 2019 in Sacramento, California. California attorney genera Xavier Becerra and California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that the State of California is suing the Trump administration challenging the legality of a new "public charge" rule that would make it difficult for immigrants to obtain green cards who receive public assistance like food stamps and Medicaid.
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California Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom admitted during a coronavirus press conference on Wednesday that he wants to take advantage of the pandemic to implement a leftist political agenda.

Newsom was asked during the news conference if he saw “potential” to use the coronavirus “crisis” to push for the implementation of a “new progressive era.”

After talking for a couple of minutes while trying to qualify his response, Newsom said, “forgive me for being long-winded, but absolutely we see this as an opportunity to reshape the way we do business and how we govern.”

Newsom continued, “And that shouldn’t put shivers up the spines of you know one party or the other. I think it’s an opportunity a new for both parties to come together and meet this moment and really start to think more systemically, not situationally, not just about getting out of this moment, but more sustainably and systemically to consider where we can go together in this historic moment if we meet it at a national level, in a state, and sub-national level.”

“So, the answer is yes,” Newsom concluded.

WATCH:

TRANSCRIPT:

QUESTION: I’m wondering if you see the potential as some others in the party do for a new progressive era, if you want to call it that, in national politics and policy and whether there’s the opportunity for additionally progressive steps such as the ones that I listed on the national and state level going forward you know because of its crisis?

CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR GAVIN NEWSOM: You know we’ve had some very deep policy conversations in this space now for weeks let us remind which despite the fact that California was running a historic economic output in terms of our GDP growth, in terms of our net, well from job creation to low unemployment, to record reserves, surpluses. The wealth distribution, the income inequality, was not something that was substantially improving and that’s the case across the rest of the world. As IT and globalization detonate at the same time you’re seeing that concentration and fewer and fewer hands, the middle-class feeling squeezed increasingly, the trend lines were suggesting what is self-evident become a headline and that is we were going from a three class society to a two class society, so something was fundamentally flawed in that global context manifested quite acutely here in the state of California, the richest and the poorest state where the number of the most impoverished metros in the country and we long been struggling to address those issues.

So, I see this quite substantively through that lens, that equity lens, looking at those folks that never fully recovered and you look at medium wages for folks coming out of 2008, 2009 in the Great Recession that haven’t fully recovered even today that are struggling. And so, what is going to happen to those folks in this current crisis and what’s the opportunity to your question for reimagining a more progressive era as it relates to capitalism? And I’m a capitalist, I’m a small business owner, I’m a job creator, my customers are the job creators, I’m beneficiary of their support and that helps build that demand that allows me to hire more people and so as a former business owner, now governor, I have had that experience and I have that appreciation of the importance of consumer confidence, consumer spending, in a vibrant middle class and so yes, forgive me for being long-winded, but absolutely we see this as an opportunity to reshape the way we do business and how we govern.

And that shouldn’t put shivers up the spines of you know one party or the other. I think it’s an opportunity a new for both parties to come together and meet this moment and really start to think more systemically, not situationally, not just about getting out of this moment, but more sustainably and systemically to consider where we can go together in this historic moment if we meet it at a national level, in a state, and sub-national level. So, the answer is yes.