News and Commentary

Desperate Hillary Panders To The Black Vote By Bashing Cops

   DailyWire.com

Hillary Clinton, panicked because Bernie Sanders has taken away the women’s vote, one pillar of her campaign, resorted to viscerally ripping the police in the United States in order to tighten her grip on the other pillar of her campaign, the black community. In her concession speech Tuesday night in New Hampshire, Clinton intoned, “We also have to break through the barriers of bigotry. African-American parents shouldn’t have to worry that their children will be harassed, humiliated, even shot because of the color of their skin.”

Clinton was doubling down on her statement in January, when she told the “Brown and Black Forum” in Iowa, “I think that when you have police violence that terrorizes communities, that doesn’t show the respect that you’re supposed to have from protecting people in your authority. That can feel, also, terrorizing.

Or was she tripling down from her January 17 statement at the Democratic debate: “There needs to be a concerted effort to address the systemic racism in our criminal justice system.”

Or was she quadrupling down from her statement last April, “From Ferguson to Staten Island to Baltimore, the patterns have become unmistakable and undeniable.”

Of course, Clinton has been using racism to stoke her campaign all along; as she told a January crowd in Iowa regarding the water crisis in Flint, Michigan: “If it had been a rich white suburb where the water was brown and smelly, people would have come immediately to the rescue of those families to protect those children to make sure they had the best chance to live up to their God-given potential!”

“African-American parents shouldn’t have to worry that their children will be harassed, humiliated, even shot because of the color of their skin.”

Hillary Clinton

The same woman trying to assuage the black community by eviscerating police is the same woman who seemed to denigrate the efforts of black icon Martin Luther King Jr., saying:

I would point to the fact that Dr. King’s dream began to be realized when president Lyndon Johnson passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, when he was able to get through Congress, that President Kennedy was hopeful to do, presidents before had not even tried. It took a president to get it done. That dream became a reality, the power of that dream became real in people’s lives because we had a president who said we’re going to do it and actually got it done.