News and Commentary

Trial Of Navy SEAL Accused Of War Crime Takes Dramatic Turn

   DailyWire.com

The trial of Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher, who is accused of killing an ISIS prisoner, took a dramatic turn on Thursday as a combat medic said during his testimony that he believes that he himself killed the terrorist and not Gallagher.

“SEAL Team Seven Medic Corey Scott, during cross-examination in the courtroom at Naval Base San Diego, revealed he killed the fighter by asphyxiation after holding his thumb over a breathing tube that had been inserted into the militant’s mouth,” Fox News reported. “He also testified that Gallagher stabbed the fighter, but did not kill him.”

“Did Chief Gallagher kill this terrorist?” Timothy Parlatore, Gallagher’s lawyer, asked Scott, who was at the time a SEAL Team Seven medic.

“No,” Scott replied.

Fox News’ Jonathan Hunt reported that while Scott was being cross-examined, Scott said that he put his thumb over a breathing tube that had been inserted into the terrorist’s mouth, covering the tube until the terrorist died of asphyxiation.

WATCH:

Navy SEALs Dylan Dille and Craig Miller took the stand on Thursday to testify against Gallagher in the case stemming from his 2017 tour of duty in Iraq.

The ISIS terrorist was delivered to the SEAL compound in Mosul with injuries and Gallagher, a trained medic, treated the terrorist.

Miller, who says that he was assisting in treating the boy, “briefly stepped away and said when he returned he saw Gallagher unexpectedly plunge a knife twice into the boy’s neck ‘right here on the right side in the jugular vein,'” CBS News reported.

“Defense lawyers say Gallagher treated the prisoner for a collapsed lung suffered in a blast from an air strike. He made an incision in his throat to insert a tube to clear the airway,” CBS News added. “They claim that disgruntled sailors fabricated the murder accusations because he was a demanding platoon leader and they didn’t want him promoted. Miller said he immediately reported the stabbing to an officer, but didn’t pursue a more formal complaint until months after returning from deployment.”

This article has been updated to include additional information.