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New ‘Woke’ Disney Junior Show Includes Song About Racial ‘Micro-Aggressions’ Targeting Preschoolers

   DailyWire.com
In this photo illustration, the Disney Junior logo is seen displayed on a smartphone screen with a Disney logo in the background.
Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

A new Disney Junior show called “Rise Up, Sing Out” includes an episode with a song designed to teach preschoolers about racial micro-aggressions in the latest woke effort by the network.

The song “Speak Up” features a young child who is surprised that another child has a parent with “darker skin.”

“Hey, Gabriel, I didn’t know that was your mom. Your skin is so much darker than hers,” the dialogue states prior to the song.

“Hold it, did that comment make you feel uncomfortable? That’s a micro-aggression,” a young female child states. After she is asked about a micro-aggression, the girl explains, ” A micro-aggression is when someone says or does something that makes you feel bad, sometimes just because of your race. But you know what? He’s wrong. You should be proud of your skin. It’s what makes you, you!”

The song then begins, with the chorus focused on “speak up” or “walk away.” The end of the song includes the words, “We can change the narrative.”

The new Disney series is described as “an animated show featuring music-based shorts that showcase an inspiring, empowering, and optimistic message about race, culture, community, and celebrating differences.”

The eight short episodes in the series are now available on Disney Plus and also air on the Disney Channel and Disney Junior. Disney Junior is a network designed for children 2 to 7 years of age.

The show’s executive producers Ahmir ”Questlove” Thompson and Tariq “Black Thought” Trotter of the Roots recently shared insights about the show in an interview with Variety.

“The ‘Rise Up, Sing Out’ shorts touch on a lot of real-world issues, especially for young Black kids, that just weren’t talked about when we were growing up. The beautiful thing about these shorts is that not only are they going to provide young kids the proper language to talk to their friends and family about some of the things that might be bothering them, but it’s also going to give parents the tools on how to respond,” Questlove and Black Thought said in a prepared statement.

“We feel this is the perfect moment and the perfect time for us to put this project out into the world to plant a seed about kindness that will hopefully have a lasting impact for generations to come,” they added.

The St. Louis American described the series, stating:

The children grapple with the harsh realities of implicit bias and the trauma that comes with bearing witness to racial violence. Before bedtime, Gabriel confesses to his abuela that he is terrified after seeing the news where he saw someone suffer simply because they had the same skin color as he has. ‘This world may seem unfair at times, but whenever you’re afraid, just keep In mind, that I’ll be here,” she responds.

The discussion of micro-aggression, racial violence, and other mature themes, however, is too much for many Americans.

As one parent on social media said, “Love your kids, turn off this stupidity and take them to the park. Don’t let them be indoctrinated in your own home.”