Analysis

COVID-19 Vaccination Rates: How Does Your State Compare?

   DailyWire.com
NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 14: Lenox Hill Hospital Chair of Emergency Medicine Yves Duroseau receives the COVID-19 vaccine from Doctor Michelle Chester at Long Island Jewish Medical Center on December 14, 2020 in New Hyde Park on Long Island, New York. The first vaccination was administered to Registered Nurse Sandra Lindsay, with Governor Andrew Cuomo attending the event remotely via video conference.
Scott Heins/Getty Images

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 32.3 million people have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine across the United States. Of these people, approximately 9.5 million people have been fully vaccinated, having received two doses.

Current CDC estimates show that approximately 1.2 million new doses were administered on February 8, which falls below the current 7-day average of over 1.4 million doses per day. In December, approximately 2.8 million vaccines were administered. Prior to Inauguration Day on January 20, an additional approximate 12.9 million doses were given.

While most statistics focus on the efficacy of the vaccine strategy on a national level, it’s important to understand success rates on a state level. Below is a breakdown of the current vaccine rates, categorized by state.

Alabama

At least one dose: 7.7%.

Two doses: 1.8%.

Alaska

At least one dose: 15%.

Two doses: 5.6%.

Arizona

At least one dose: 9.3%.

Two doses: 2.2%.

Arkansas

At least one dose: 10.1%.

Two doses: 3.1%.

California

At least one dose: 9.6%.

Two doses: 2.1%.

Colorado

At least one dose: 9.4%.

Two doses: 3.6%.

Connecticut

At least one dose: 11.4%.

Two doses: 3.6%.

Delaware

At least one dose: 10.3%.

Two doses: 2.6%.

Florida

At least one dose: 9.2%.

Two doses: 2.9%.

Georgia

At least one dose: 8.7%.

Two doses: 2.1%.

Hawaii

At least one dose: 10.0%.

Two doses: 3.0%.

Idaho

At least one dose: 8.4%.

Two doses: 2.0%.

Illinois

At least one dose: 8.9%.

Two doses: 2.4%.

Indiana

At least one dose: 8.8%.

Two doses: 2.3%.

Iowa

At least one dose: 8.0%.

Two doses: 2.8%.

Kansas

At least one dose: 8.0%.

Two doses: 2.4%.

Kentucky

At least one dose: 9.7%.

Two doses: 2.9%.

Louisiana

At least one dose: 9.4%.

Two doses: 3.8%.

Maine

At least one dose: 9.8%.

Two doses: 3.3%.

Maryland

At least one dose: 8.8%.

Two doses: 2.5%.

Massachusetts

At least one dose: 9.1%.

Two doses: 2.5%.

Michigan

At least one dose: 9.4%.

Two doses: 3.3%.

Minnesota

At least one dose: 9.6%.

Two doses: 2.9%.

Mississippi

At least one dose: 9.0%.

Two doses: 2.0%.

Missouri

At least one dose: 8.0%.

Two doses: 2.4%.

Montana

At least one dose: 9.6%.

Two doses: 3.4%.

Nebraska

At least one dose: 8.5%.

Two doses: 3.5%.

Nevada

At least one dose: 9.0%.

Two doses: 2.2%.

New Hampshire

At least one dose: 8.8%.

Two doses: 3.4%.

New Jersey

At least one dose: 9.3%.

Two doses: 2.5%.

New Mexico

At least one dose: 12.0%.

Two doses: 4.2%.

New York

At least one dose: 9.1%.

Two doses: 2.8%.

North Carolina

At least one dose: 9.5%.

Two doses: 2.6%.

North Dakota

At least one dose: 11.5%.

Two doses: 5.0%.

Ohio

At least one dose: 8.9%.

Two doses: 2.6%.

Oklahoma

At least one dose: 10.9%.

Two doses: 3.8%.

Oregon

At least one dose: 9.8%.

Two doses: 3.3%.

Pennsylvania

At least one dose: 8.7%.

Two doses: 2.6%.

Rhode Island

At least one dose: 8.0%.

Two doses: 3.3%.

South Carolina

At least one dose: 8.9%.

Two doses: 2.3%.

South Dakota

At least one dose: 10.5%.

Two doses: 4.6%.

Tennessee

At least one dose: 8.1%.

Two doses: 3.6%.

Texas

At least one dose: 8.7%.

Two doses: 2.8%.

Utah

At least one dose: 9.5%.

Two doses: 3.3%.

Vermont

At least one dose: 10.1%.

Two doses: 4.4%.

Virginia

At least one dose: 10.5%.

Two doses: 2.4%.

Washington

At least one dose: 9.6%.

Two doses: 2.5%.

West Virginia

At least one dose: 12.2%.

Two doses: 5.8%.

Wisconsin

At least one dose: 10.2%.

Two doses: 2.7%.

Wyoming

At least one dose: 10.2%.

Two doses: 2.9%.

Takeaways

If we sort these states by percentage of people given at least one dose of the vaccine, the top ten states are Alaska (15%), West Virginia (12%), New Mexico (11%), North Dakota (11%), Connecticut (11%), Oklahoma (11%), Virginia (11%), South Dakota (10%), Delaware (10%), and Wisconsin (10%). The bottom ten states are Alabama (7.7%), Kansas (8.0%), Missouri (8.0%), Iowa (8.0%), Rhode Island (8.0%), Tennessee (8.1%), Idaho (8.4%), Nebraska (8.5%), Pennsylvania (8.7%) and Texas (8.7%).

If we sort these states by percentage of people fully vaccinated with two doses, the top ten states are West Virginia (7.5%), Alaska (5.6%), North Dakota (5.0%), South Dakota (4.6%), Vermont (4.4%), New Mexico (4.2%), Oklahoma (3.8%), Louisiana (3.8%), Tennessee (3.6%), and Colorado (3.6%). The bottom ten states are Alabama (1.8%), Mississippi (2.0%), Idaho (2.0%), Georgia (2.1%), California (2.1%), Nevada (2.2%), Arizona (2.2%), South Carolina (2.3%), Indiana (2.3%), and Kansas (2.4%).

It’s also interesting to look at the numbers of doses delivered and the number of doses administered, giving us the percentage of doses used by each state.

If we sort these states by percentage of doses used, then the top ten states are Utah (103%), North Dakota (99%), New Mexico (94%), West Virginia (91%), South Carolina (86%), Montana (85%), South Dakota (83%), Wisconsin (82%), Virginia (82%), and Nevada (81%). The bottom ten states are Alabama (58%), Alaska (61%), Kansas (62%), Rhode Island (63%), Pennsylvania (63%), Mississippi (64%), Massachusetts (65%), New Hampshire (65%), Maryland (66%), and Missouri (67%).

California has received the most doses, with over 6.9 million doses delivered and over 4.6 million doses administered (67%). Texas is second, receiving over 4.4 million doses but administering a larger proportion of 75% (over 3.3 million doses). Florida comes third, receiving almost 3.8 million doses and administering over 2.6 million (6.9%).

It seems like there is strong correlation — unsurprisingly — between state population size and vaccine distribution efficiency. The smaller states by population — for example, Wyoming, Vermont, and North and South Dakota — received the fewest number of doses, but have among the highest percentage of doses used and percentage of people given at least one dose. Conversely, the most populous states — California, Texas, Florida, and New York — received far more doses but have a lower rate of people receiving at least one shot.

Out of these states, California has the highest percentage of people receiving at least one shot (9.6%) while Texas has the least (8.1%). However, Florida has the highest percentage of people receiving both shots (2.9%), while California has the least (2.1%). By percentage of doses administered, Texas also leads the most populous states, having administered 75% of its doses compared to California (67%), Florida (69%), and New York (72%).

According to the CDC, out of these four states, New York still has the highest death rate, with New York City alone experiencing 330 deaths per 100,000 compared to Florida (129), Texas (133), and California (111). Indeed, New York City was hit so hard by COVID-19 that the CDC charts list New York City and New York state separately.

Ian Haworth is an Editor and Writer for The Daily Wire. Follow him on Twitter at @ighaworth.

The views expressed in this piece are the author’s own and do not necessarily represent those of The Daily Wire.

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