Leftist puppet-master George Soros does not like being the topic of news. He prefers ventriloquizing Democratic candidates and funding his liberal agenda from behind the curtain. This week, Soros was drawn out from the shadows by Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban, who accused the billionaire investor "of being a prominent member of a circle of 'activists' trying to undermine European nations by supporting refugees heading to the continent from the Middle East and beyond," according to Bloomberg Business.

"His name is perhaps the strongest example of those who support anything that weakens nation states, they support everything that changes the traditional European lifestyle. These activists who support immigrants inadvertently become part of this international human-smuggling network," Orban said recently.

Soros has already admitted responsibility for perpetuating the migrant crisis in Europe, insisting that "national borders are an obstacle" to the influx of Muslim men pouring in without following proper security protocols. Despite aggressive efforts to maintain a low-profile, this is not the first time that Soros has found himself in the midst of leftist demagoguery.

Here are five things you need to know about George Soros:

1. Soros injects millions of dollars into a goulash of leftist organizations, including the ACLU, Centre for American Progress, and Open Society Foundations. Funding both the Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama campaigns, the Hungarian hedge-fund billionaire has advanced efforts to oppose both the War on Drugs and the State of Israel. Soros' "shadow networks" secretly finance left-wing causes that promote anti-American sentiments and undermine U.S. counter-terrorism policies.

2. Soros has a "god complex." The Los Angeles Times notes:

It seems that Soros believes he was anointed by God. "I fancied myself as some kind of god ..." he once wrote. "If truth be known, I carried some rather potent messianic fantasies with me from childhood, which I felt I had to control, otherwise they might get me in trouble."

After donating more than $24 million to John Kerry's failed 2004 presidential bid, Soros lamented the fact that he was unable to materialize his motto: "If I spend enough, I will make it right." Soros' self-aware narcissism is horrifying.

"I am sort of a deus ex machina. I am something unnatural. I'm very comfortable with my public persona because it is one I have created for myself. It represents what I like to be as distinct from what I really am. You know, in my personal capacity I'm not actually a selfless philanthropic person. I've very much self-centered," Soros told The New York Times in 1994.

Soros is as callous as he is calculated, telling a British tabloid, "It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out."

3. Soros' currency speculation is responsible for tanking foreign financial markets. Newsmax reports, "As a provocative investor, Soros took a huge risk of some $10 billion on a currency speculation, shorting the British pound. The pound trade earned him more than $1 billion, but he was later called 'the man who broke the Bank of England'...Soros also bet against the Thailand currency, which critics say helped cause the Asian financial crisis of 1997."

"His name is perhaps the strongest example of those who support anything that weakens nation states, they support everything that changes the traditional European lifestyle."

Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban on George Soros

4. Soros exploits his political clout for financial gain and a return on his investments. Contrary to the romanticized portrait of a 'bleeding-heart liberal,' Soros leverages his cozy political relationships in order to compound his personal wealth. The Washington Free Beacon documents:

While Soros has increased his multi-million dollar investments in both U.S. and foreign companies that extract shale oil and gas, the Obama administration has championed natural gas as a less carbon-intensive bridge fuel toward a “clean-energy future.” The administration’s proposal to offer incentives to companies that use trucks powered by natural gas would benefit Westport Innovations, a company that converts diesel engines for natural gas use and is partially owned by Soros’ hedge fund.

Soros’ political advocacy also tends to blend with his investments. He proposed in 2009 that developed countries create a “green fund” to combat climate change in developing countries by directing billions from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) toward forestry, land-use, and agricultural projects. Soros’ fund controls more than a $200 million stake in Adecoagro, a Luxembourg-based company that owns hundreds of thousands of acres of farmland in South America and would benefit from the IMF cash infusion.

Soros himself has said, “there are occasionally symbiotic moments between political and business interests."

5. Soros is the chief financier of Obama's polarizing race-baiting. The billionaire catalyzed the Ferguson riots that destroyed businesses and burned down private property. "Mr. Soros spurred the Ferguson protest movement through years of funding and mobilizing groups across the U.S., according to interviews with key players and financial records reviewed by The Washington Times." The Times adds, "In all, Mr. Soros gave at least $33 million in one year to support already-established groups that emboldened the grass-roots, on-the-ground activists in Ferguson, according to the most recent tax filings of his nonprofit Open Society Foundations. The financial tether from Mr. Soros to the activist groups gave rise to a combustible protest movement that transformed a one-day criminal event in Missouri into a 24-hour-a-day national cause celebre."