Illegal immigration provides a net benefit to the American economy, said Juan Williams during a Wednesday interview with David’s Webb eponymous radio program on Sirius XM.

Illegal immigrants were being shortchanged in terms of their contributions to government coffers via taxes while not having full access to the complete menu of governmentally-administered redistributive public benefits, added Williams. Williams said that illegal immigrants were paying more to the government via taxes than they were receiving in benefits.

Asked whether “chain-migration” associated with the Hart-Celler Act of 1965 had contributed to a “suppression of middle class wages,” Williams answered in the negative.

“People don’t take into account the tremendous economic dynamism that’s been introduced to the country by immigrants. And the idea that illegal immigrant are somehow, you know, sucking off the tit of the country and not contributing - they don’t even get to collect on the taxes that they pay into the country,” replied Williams.

Research studies from the Heritage Foundation and Center For Immigration Studies contradict Williams's assertions, indicating that illegal immigrants, on balance, are net consumers of redistributed welfare programs driven by the government.

Williams made no mention of the costs associated with combating the commissions of crimes committed by illegal immigrants. Contrary to left-wing narratives to the contrary, and setting aside crimes pertaining to their unlawful presence in the country, illegal immigrants are disproportionately represented in the commission of crime.

Given Williams’s support for widespread legalization of the continuing presence of foreigners’ illegally in the country under the guise of “comprehensive immigration reform,” observers can assume that he wants amnestied illegal aliens to be given access to Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation, food stamps, public housing, and a plethora of other governmentally-driven redistributive welfare programs.


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