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New ‘Suicide Pod’ Unveiled In Australia, Has A Detachable Coffin

“Glorified gas chamber”

Dr Philip Nitschke responds publicly after his de-registration from the Australian Medican Board on July 24, 2014 in Adelaide, Australia.
David Mariuz / Stringer / Getty Images

In the near future, people may be able to step inside of an all-inclusive suicide pod that not only gets the deadly job done but also provides the very capsule in which people can be buried.

 

According to LifeNews, Australian euthanasia activist Dr. Philip Nitschke, a.k.a. "Dr Death," recently unveiled his 3D printed suicide capsule that comes with a coffin.

"The death pod, also referred to as a 'glorified gas chamber' was first envisioned in 2012," reports the outlet. "It contains canisters of liquid nitrogen which is released when activated by the person inside the capsule within the pod, causing oxygen levels to plummet to very low levels and starving the individual of the air he or she needs, causing their death. The capsule is then detached from the pod and serves as a coffin for the occupant."

The capsule was unveiled at the "Disrupting Death" workshop in Queensland, Australia, and promised people that it will kill them with "style and euphoria," with Nitschke claiming that people will experience an "elegant almost euphoric" death when using the pod.

"The idea of using a machine to have absolute control really has been a long-term interest of mine," he told Exit International. "So, a person can, with minimal involvement, get into the machine and press a button for a very peaceful, elegant almost-euphoric death.”

Since suicide is not recognized as a criminal offense in Australia, the machine is not illegal.

 

The new suicide pod is a version of the "Sarco capsule" that Nitschke has been developing for years in association with his organization Exit International. Here's a brief video description:

After taking an online mental questionnaire, people are then provided with a four-digit access code to help build the Sarco capsule via 3D printer.

 

“Sarco does not use any restricted drugs, or require any special expertise such as the insertion of an intravenous needle," Nitschke of his device. "Anyone who can pass the entry test, can enter the machine and legally end their life."

"There is no dignity, let alone beauty, lying on a rubber sheeted bed in an institution, hooked up to beeping machines working hard to provide us with a few more seconds of life," Nitschke said of his capsule this past May, according to Fast Company. "The role of design is to turn something that is hitherto thought of as terrifying, and sometimes repulsive, into something that [is] nothing to be scared of, and even something that is to be embraced. A process – an experience – that is self-directed by the person, reliable (so there can be no doubt about the outcome and there is no need to worry about failure), dignified (in that there is no need to be hooked to a machine, you don't have to undress or wear special clothing). I would also add 'bold,' in that a death in a Sarco will never be seen as a withering away. Rather, any person who would choose to use a Sarco is also making a very deliberate statement to the world."

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