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George Mason University President Has 'Painful' News For Students Upset With Kavanaugh Hiring

"Even if the outcome is painful, what’s at stake is very, very important for the integrity of the university."

George Mason University students upset about Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh teaching a class in England this Summer have, in so many words, been told by president Angel Cabrera to take a hike.

Earlier this month, triggered students at GMU demanded that Kavanaugh be removed from the faculty despite his class being taught in Runnymede, England — where the Magna Carta was signed. The students argued that women would be deeply harmed by Kavanaugh's presence among the faculty due to the sexual assault allegation brought against him by Christine Blasey Ford without corroborating evidence during his confirmation hearing.

"The hiring of Kavanaugh threatens the mental well-being of all survivors on this campus," a female student told The College Fix at the time.

According to HuffPost, GMU president Angel Cabrera told students that while he understands they are upset about Kavanaugh's hiring, the university will not reverse course.

"Even if the outcome is painful, what’s at stake is very, very important for the integrity of the university," Cabrera said during a two-hour town hall, prompting gasps from the audience.

"Oh, my God," one female student gasped in response to the news.

Students have been fighting hard to get Kavanaugh kicked off the faculty and his three-year teaching contract terminated.

"GMU’s student government organized the event, along with student group Mason for Survivors," reports HuffPost. "The town hall comes after protests, an ad campaign and a student-led petition with more than 10,000 signatures opposing Kavanaugh’s hire."

"Dozens of students came out for Tuesday’s town hall, where Cabrera and other school officials took precleared questions from students," the report continued. "The first hour was closed to the public as students shared personal stories of being sexually assaulted."

The faculty stood their ground and did not cave to student demands. Provost S. David Wu said he saw "no reason for university administrators to override" their decision. Cabrera said the school needed to protect its power to hire whomever it wishes. Students often objected to the hiring by saying it would affect the mental health of sexual assault survivors.

"In hiring Kavanaugh, to what extent did you consider the mental health of the survivors on campus and how that might affect them and their education?" one male student asked.

Another 19-year-old student shouted a question over students in which he asked the staff if they would be comfortable knowing their children were in close proximity to a man accused of sexual assault.

Cabrera essentially said that the students have no say in how faculty are chosen. "Even if in this particular case the outcome is one that you deeply disagree with, the process by which these decisions are made and the reason why we are so firm in defending them is actually essential to the way a university like ours operates," he said.

GMU president Cabrera has been consistent in his defense of the university hiring Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh from the outset. When the criticism first started, Cabrera even said that Kavanaugh is not a "crazy appointment."

"He has been confirmed by — this is not a crazy appointment," said Cabrera earlier this month. "This is a Supreme Court justice who is going to be teaching about the United States Constitution. So from that standpoint, I believe I am not going to question the judgment of that. It’s not a crazy appointment. … Having a Supreme Court justice is going to create value for the students. The students, by the way, have agreed. The students have signed up to this class."

 
 
 

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