Creepy: Netflix Employs Practicing Wiccans To Fact-Check 'Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina'

"We have a few people who are practicing Wiccans"

A general view at the after party for the premiere of Netflix's 'Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina' at the Hollywood Athletic Club on October 19, 2018 in Los Angeles, California.
Kevin Winter / Staff / Getty Images
 

In case you ever wondered why the Netflix reboot of "Chilling Adventures of Sabrina" seemed so eerily satanic, maybe it has something to do with the fact that the streaming service employs actual Wiccans to ensure maximum accuracy.

 

According to LifeSiteNews, actress Kiernan Shipka (who plays the iconic teenage witch in the reboot) told Jimmy Kimmel this week that both she and the show's writers consult real Wiccans for better authenticity.

"How do you prepare to play a witch?" Kimmel asked Shipka. "Do you do a ride-along on a broom or whatnot?"

Shipka first jokingly quipped she goes on "a few ride-alongs, a few seances" before admitting the truth: "We have a few people who are practicing Wiccans … it’s nice. You feel like you’re making the right moves and doing the right things. You feel like you have some advisory, which is really nice. We’re not all just doing this."

 

"Sabrina, the Teenage Witch" returned to the small screen once again in October 2018 as the "Chilling Adventures of Sabrina." This time, however, the light-hearted innocence of the original Melissa Joan Hart sitcom was jettisoned in favor of an unapologetically dark, satanic tone, shot-through by occasional bouts of meta-humor.

In this darkly twisted version, gone are the laugh tracks and cheerful one-liners of the original, where witchcraft and magic were more of a punchline to a joke rather than an actual force for Sabrina to reckon with. Here, the "teenage witch" is a newly-minted 16-year-old on the cusp of signing her soul over to a coven of Satan-worshippers, which her two aunts – Zelda and Hilda – are all too eager to facilitate.

As the series rolled out, Netflix played heavy into the satanism angle when the streaming service sent to its subscribers a rather unsettling email inviting people to witness Sabrina's "Dark Baptism" to the "Dark Lord" on her sixteenth birthday:

Your presence is requested at the Dark Baptism of the teenage witch Sabrina Spellman.

Join us as we gather under the eclipsing blood moon, at the stroke of midnight on her sixteenth birthday.

Bear witness as Sabrina signs her name to the Book of the Beast and begins her journey on the path of night, just as the Dark Lord intended.

 

The letter was signed by Sabrina's two famous aunts, Hilda Spellman and Zelda Spellman, who are played in the show by Lucy Davis and Mirando Otto, respectively.

"Chilling Adventures of Sabrina" comes at a time when witchcraft is gaining popularity among millennials. According to Market Watch, "interest in spirituality has been booming in recent years while interest in religion plummets, especially among millennials." Worse still, a majority of Americans now believe it is "not necessary to believe in God to have good morals."

The replacement for many of these young adults has been astrology, which involves aura reading, mediumship, tarot card reading, and palmistry. Adherents to these practices grew 2% between 2011 and 2016, creating an industry that is now worth $2 billion annually.

Recently, witchcraft has even entered the political realm, with covens across the country openly inviting occult practitioners to partake in hexing spells against President Trump and Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

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