Journalist Fired After Wanting Covington Catholic Students And Their Parents 'To Die'

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While most who called for physical violence or even death to a group of high school students who were unfairly targeted as harassers will suffer no consequences for their actions, one media outlet has taken action against one of its own for his contribution.

 

A journalist who contributed to Vulture has been fired from his main job at INE Entertainment after he publicly wished for the Covington Catholic students and their parents “to die.”

“I don’t know what it says about me but I’ve truly lost the ability to articulate the hysterical rage, nausea, and heartache this makes me feel. I just want these people to die. Simple as that. Every single one of them. And their parents,” Erik Abriss said on Saturday in a tweet.

“'Racism is in its Boomer death throes. It will die out with this younger generation!’ Look at the shit-eating grins on all those young white slugs’ faces. Just perverse pleasure at wielding a false dominion they’ve been taught their whole life was their divine right. F–ing die,” he added in a follow-up tweet.

INE Entertainment, where Abriss was a post-production supervisor, fired him after the tweets, according to TheWrap.

 

“We were surprised and upset to see the inflammatory and offensive rhetoric used on Erik Abriss’ Twitter account this weekend. He worked with the company in our post-production department and never as a writer,” the company said in a statement to TheWrap.

“While we appreciated his work, it is clear that he is no longer aligned with our company’s core values of respect and tolerance. Therefore, as of January 21, 2019, we have severed ties with Abriss,” the company added.

 

Abriss did not respond to an inquiry from TheWrap, but has since set his Twitter account to private. Even after his tweet was written about, he continued to smear the Covington Catholic students, calling them “MAGA chuds” and “racist.”

The original misreporting of the incident claimed the white, male teenagers of Covington Catholic surrounded and harassed a group of Native Americans. In reality, the students themselves were harassed by a group of Black Hebrew Israelites who shouted racial and anti-gay slurs at the teenagers, who responded by singing school songs to drown out the hate. The Native Americans then entered the group of students and marched up to one, while the leader, Nathan Phillips, banged his drum in the face of one of the teens.

But since the incident was portrayed as white male Trump supporters harassing a Native American, the kids received threats of death and physical violence, which has led to the school closing its doors Tuesday due to security concerns.

Lawyers are now offering to help the students sue media outlets and individuals who helped spread misinformation against them, including The New York Times, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and comedienne Kathy Griffin. At the time of this writing, it is unclear whether any of the students have actually hired an attorney to assist them in this endeavor, but many on Twitter are collecting examples of alleged libel to be used if any student chooses to do so.

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