ANOTHER: New Orleans Women's March CANCELED After 'Drastic' Drop In Support

John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Organizers of the New Orleans Women's March say their January event is now off after a "drastic" drop-off in support, The Washington Times reports.

“Due to several issues we have decided it is necessary to cancel the 2019 Women’s March in New Orleans,” the National Organization for Women’s Baton Rouge chapter posted on social media Friday.

Though they did not initially specify the "issues" that led to NOW canceling the New Orleans Women's March — one of the largest in the country — a further statement indicated a severe drop-off in both participation and fundraising after two major exposes in Tablet and in The New York Times revealed that the national Women's March's hierarchy was a hotbed of anti-Semitic thought.

NOW Baton Rouge was clear it believes the national Women's March leadership, including organizers Bob Bland, Tamika Mallory, Linda Sarsour, and Carmen Perez, should resign.

"Many of the sister marches have asked the leaders of Women’s March, Inc. to resign but as of today, they have yet to do so,” NOW Baton Rouge's statement read. “The controversy is dampening efforts of sister marches to fundraise, enlist involvement, find sponsors and attendee numbers have drastically declined this year. New Orleans is no exception.”

NOW Baton Rouge added that while they will be moving away from the annual marches, they will continue to work on behalf of the "resistance" in Louisiana.

"However, this does not mean the end of our momentum in Louisiana. It’s time to look past the marching and look towards a new stage of the movement," they added. "Going forward, we will re-organize and re-evaluate the momentum that the Women’s March gave all of us the first two years."

To prevent accusations of mismanagement, Baton Rouge NOW noted that they will be refunding donations and t-shirt purchases from unhappy members.

Although conservative organizations have been reporting regularly on Women's March leaders like Sarsour and Mallory, and their support for the virulently anti-Semitic Nation of Islam and it's bombastic leader Louis Farrakhan, stories published in Tablet and The New York Times revealed to the mainstream that several of the March's key players associated regularly with the NOI and had openly expressed anti-Semitic sentiments, even in the early days of the Women's March organization.

The New York Times and Tablet reports revealed that Sarsour, Mallory, and Perez pushed out Jewish women in leadership positions in the Women's March, and that Mallory — who only recently attended the Nation of Islam's "Saviors Day" event where Farrakhan likened Jews to tools of the devil — "confronted" Jewish Women's March leaders over their role in the "oppression" of minorities.

Mallory, Tablet says, “asserted that Jewish people bore a special collective responsibility as exploiters of black and brown people—and even, according to a close secondhand source, claimed that Jews were proven to have been leaders of the American slave trade.”

Instead of apologizing and distancing themselves from the Nation of Islam, the Women's March has issued a series of lukewarm statements on "intersectionality." Mallory herself issued a shocking statement to The New York Times that only made the situation worse.

The revelations have triggered a wave of Women's March cancellations.

In fact, the New Orleans Women's March is just the latest in a number of Women's Marches that won't be marching this year. Last week, the Chicago Women's March announced that it was canceling its annual event, which drew more than a quarter million people last year, over the same accusations of anti-Semitism. Several other, smaller marches are also canceled.

The Humboldt County Women's March was also canceled, but for reasons unrelated to the national March. Northern California will not have a march because organizers — bizarrely — believed the March would be "too white."

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