WATCH: Planned Parenthood Admits Unborn Children Are Babies In Sex-Ed Video

"A baby grows in a parent’s belly"

A sign hangs above a Planned Parenthood clinic on May 18, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois. The Trump administration is expected to announce a plan for massive funding cuts to Planned Parenthood
Photo by Scott Olson/Staff/Getty Images

It seems that even abortion conglomerate Planned Parenthood agrees with pro-lifers that the little being who grows inside a woman's belly for nine months is, in fact, a "baby."

Released this past November, an animated sex-ed video from Planned Parenthood teaches parents about how to speak to their children should they ever be asked by the little tykes: "Where do babies come from?" As noted by Katie Yoder of National Review, the video has gone largely unnoticed since its release.

At no point throughout the three-minute video does the narrator refer to the baby as a fetus. In fact, the baby is at all times referred to as a baby.

"You can say 'A baby grows in a parent’s belly and comes out of their vagina,'" the narrator advises parents to tell their kids. "That may be all it takes to satisfy their curiosity."

The video continues to arguably make the case that human life begins at conception. "If they ask, 'How does the baby get in the belly?' you can say something like, 'Most women have tiny eggs in a special part of their belly," says the narrator. "Most men have very tiny seeds, called sperm. If sperm and egg meet they can grow into a baby.'"

With this video, it is clear that Planned Parenthood is an organization that recognizes the life growing inside a woman's womb is a baby, not a creature or a ball of goop. Later, however, the narrator refers to these babies as a "choice" without mentioning abortion, advising parents to instruct their children about birth control methods.

"It’s a big responsibility and a personal choice, and what’s right for one person isn’t always right for another," the narrator says. "Kids can also understand that there are ways to prevent pregnancy. You can say something like, 'There are things people can use that stop sperm from getting to an egg, if they don’t want to have a baby.'"

Here's the full transcript for the video:

There’s no way around it — at some point, your little one will ask, "Where do babies come from?" It’s normal for children to be curious about pregnancy and reproduction. Don’t worry: you don’t need to be an expert, or give them every single detail. The most important thing is being open and available when they want to talk, and giving simple answers they can understand.

First things first: try to stay calm and not act upset if your kid asks a question that makes you feel shocked or embarrassed. Young kids don’t know that talking about this stuff can be awkward for adults. Being open and calm sends the message that it’s ok for them to talk with you about it. A good place to start is to ask them where the question is coming from. Are they wondering how they were born? Did they hear something from a friend? This will help you figure out how best to answer. With younger children you can keep it simple and direct.

For example, you can say “A baby grows in a parent’s belly and comes out of their vagina.” That may be all it takes to satisfy their curiosity. If they ask, “How does the baby get in the belly?” You can say something like, “Most women have tiny eggs in a special part of their belly. Most men have very tiny seeds, called sperm. If sperm and egg meet they can grow into a baby.”

Afterwards, check their understanding and encourage more discussion by asking, “Does that answer your question?” or, “What else do you want to know?” It’s really up to you to decide how much detail you want to provide, based on the conversations you’ve already had, and what you think your child can understand.

There are many ways to make a family, and kids this age can absolutely understand reproduction in a way that includes LGBTQ parents, as well as families who came together through adoption, surrogacy, or reproductive assistance. You can say things like, “some families have a mommy and a daddy, some have two mommies, and some have two daddies.” Or “sometimes eggs and sperm need a little help from other people to get together and make a baby.” It’s also good for kids to understand that some people have babies and some don’t. It’s a big responsibility and a personal choice, and what’s right for one person isn’t always right for another.

Kids can also understand that there are ways to prevent pregnancy. You can say something like, “There are things people can use that stop sperm from getting to an egg, if they don’t want to have a baby.” Research shows that open and honest discussions about this stuff doesn’t encourage kids to have sex any earlier. Instead they show your kid that they can talk with you for information and help. Want to learn more? Check out plannedparenthood.org/parents

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