Carlson Criticizes Trump In Shock Interview, Suggests Ocasio-Cortez Is The Future

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Fox News host Tucker Carlson ripped President Donald Trump in a shocking interview earlier this week with a foreign magazine, saying he does not believe Trump is "capable."

In an interview on Tuesday with Die Weltwoche, a Swiss weekly magazine, Carlson told Urs Gehriger at his Fox News office in Washington, D.C. that Trump has not kept his promises and has not achieved his goals.

"His chief promises were that he would build the wall, de-fund planned parenthood, and repeal Obamacare, and he hasn't done any of those things," Carlson said. "I don't think he's capable. I don't think he's capable of sustained focus. I don't think he understands the system. I don't think the Congress is on his side. I don't think his own agencies support him."

Carlson said that he does not believe Trump is the type of president that makes a promise and then has the ability to hunker down and see it through to completion.

"I think Trump's role is to begin the conversation about what actually matters," Carlson explained. "We were not having any conversation about immigration before Trump arrived in Washington. People were bothered about it in different places in the country. It's a huge country, but that was not a staple of political debate at all. Trump asked basic questions like' 'Why don't our borders work?' 'Why should we sign a trade agreement and let the other side cheat?' Or my favorite of all, 'What's the point of NATO?' The point of NATO was to keep the Soviets from invading western Europe but they haven't existed in 27 years, so what is the point? These are obvious questions that no one could answer."

"Apart from asking these very important questions has he really achieved nothing?" Gehriger asked.

"Not much. Not much," Carlson answered. "Much less than he should have. I've come to believe he's not capable of it."

Carlson explained that he doesn't believe Trump has really achieved anything because "the legislative process in this country by design is highly complex, and it's designed to be complex as a way of diffusing power, of course, because the people who framed our Constitution, founded our country, were worried about concentrations of power."

"They balanced it among the three branches as you know and they made it very hard to make legislation," Carlson continued. "In order to do it you really have to understand how it works and you have to be very focused on getting it done, and he knows very little about the legislative process, hasn't learned anything, hasn't surrounded himself with people that can get it done, hasn't done all the things you need to do so. It's mostly his fault that he hasn't achieved those things. I'm not in charge of Trump."

Carlson, who answered questions on a multitude of issues, later criticized aspects of capitalism.

"Capitalism drives change, innovation change, the old ways give way to new ways of doing things, and in the process of change the weak get hurt always. This was true in industrialization 100 years ago and it's true in the digital revolution now," Carlson said. "What's changed is that nobody is standing up on behalf of the people who are being crushed by the change."

Carlson later appeared to suggest that socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is the future.

"Is that really so?" Gehriger asked. "Look at the grassroot movement on the left: Alexandra Ocasio Cortez and her socialist group. It is probably a 100 years ago when Americans last saw a socialist movement of substance emerging?"

"Yes," Carlson said. "You're absolutely right. That's the future."

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