Man Behind 3D Gun Files Spoils The Left's Celebration Over Ban With Major Announcement

Wilson will simply sell the files he's been unconstitutionally banned from posting openly.

Cody Wilson.
Photo by Kelly West/AFP/Getty Images

The anti-gun Left could not contain their excitement when news broke on Monday that a federal judge in Seattle extended a ban on Austin-based company Defense Distributed which prevented it from hosting 3D-printable gun files, though the company has a license from the State Department to do so, and, you know, First Amendment protections.

The ruling was intensely shaky and a jab to both the First and Second Amendment, so naturally Democrats were aroused.

But their celebration was premature.

Defense Distributed founder Cody Wilson crushed their short-lived happiness during a Tuesday press conference where he revealed that he actually won't be stopped from sharing technical data; he will simply sell the files via his website, defcad.com. (Yes, he can do this.)

"This judge's order, stopping us from simply giving things away, was only an authorization that we could sell it, that we could mail it, that we could email it, that we could provide it by secure transfer. I will be doing all of those things, now," announced Wilson.

"A lot of this to me was about principle," he continued. "For many years, I just chose not to sell these files, because I'm an open-source activist. I believed in demonstrating that there was a right to commit this information to the public domain."

"But, this is my opportunity to correct the media all in one place. To read headline after headline about how you can no longer 3D-print a gun, you can no longer have these files, this is not true. This has never been true. I now have to demonstrate this to you, forcefully, to deliver the point."

There is no set price for the material; patrons are asked to give whatever they'd like in exchange. Wilson said the money would be used for further legal fees.

"Everyone who wants these files in America can get them," he said. "They're allowed to name their own price at our website. Making money is not important to me."

The 30-year-old said he's "happy now to become the iTunes of downloadable guns if I can't be the Napster," but added that it was somewhat "regrettable" that state attorneys general drove him into the commercial space.

"The only person who was hurt by the [Seattle ruling] is the common man," Wilson noted later in the presser, again adding that he will not be stopped.

Defcad will also allow the public to sell their own files via the site.

To call an end to the conference, Wilson joked, "I have to go talk to Alex Jones, now. You know, the real news."

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