Hillary Clinton Says Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh Could Bring Back Slavery

"Now I worry they want to turn it back to the 1850s."

It was only a matter of time before failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton weighed in on President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, and it appears to have been time she spent working on a top notch critique: that Kavanaugh could return the United States to the days of slavery.

Speaking to the American Federation of Teachers Friday night, Clinton warned of "devastating consequences" if Kavanaugh is confirmed to the bench.

"Let me say a word about the nomination of Judge Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court," Clinton said in her speech. "This nomination holds out the threat of devastating consequences for workers rights, civil rights, LGBT rights, women’s rights — including those to make our own health decisions."

"It is a blatant attempt by this administration to shift the balance of the Court for decades and to reverse decades of progress," Clinton continued.

And that's where she landed on her new strategy of attack: warning of a return to the agrarian pre-Civil War America.

"I used to worry that they [the Republicans] wanted to turn the clock back to the 1950s. Now I worry they want to turn it back to the 1850s," Clinton said.

The 1850s, of course, predate the American Civil War, meaning that Clinton believes that under Kavanaugh it may be possible for the United States to return to a time where enslaving members of the human race was not simply legal, but regular practice in many states. Given her fear for both women and minorities, it seems she's extrapolating on the leftist fear of an instituted "Handmaid's Tale," where subjugation is a matter of course.

That would be a tough hill to climb for Kavanaugh, considering that he'd need to retroactively declare the 13th Amendment off the books, a declaration that would require not just a Supreme Court decision, but an action by a majority of American states.

Clinton clearly has no idea what it means to be an "originalist" when it comes to the Constitution.

Ironically, Clinton closed out her speech by warning the American Federation of Teachers to embrace their political opponents, lest President Trump sow the seeds of disunity. She warned that Trump is trying to "rip the heart out of America," and "turn us against each other, they want to divide and conquer."

Suggesting the president's Supreme Court nominee will overturn a Constitutional ban on slavery in America certainly doesn't move that needle in the right direction.

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