California University Encourages Parents To Let Kids Watch Porn

"Viewing pornography is a normal habit"

Pop artist Sham Ibrahim and Stormy Daniels attend her fan meet and greet at Chi Chi LaRue's on May 23, 2018 in West Hollywood, California.
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One of California's top universities, UC Santa Barbara, is now encouraging parents to let their children watch porn because it is "generally harmless" for four-year-olds to touch each other's genitals.

The SexInfo Online website, operated by UCSB students specializing in human sexuality, offers a variety of topics regarding sex. One such topic, according to The College Fix, discusses a little something called "Childhood Sexuality," which advises parents on how they should react to seeing their kids engaging in masturbation and "sexual play."

The topic focuses on pre-pubescent children.

"It is important for caregivers and parents to keep their reactions to children’s consensual sexual activity and play positive," the site says, arguing that the alternative could create feelings of guilt within the child. Even parents who witness their children "touching each others genitals" should be unafraid because "children are just exploring."

In an article titled "Talking To Your Child About Sex," parents are also advised not to "lecture" their children about sex and should let them "make their own decisions regarding sex."

"Give them the information and resources needed to make informed decisions," the article reads.

If that's not bad enough, the article encourages parents to teach their kids that watching pornography is a "normal habit."

"It is important that children understand that viewing pornography is a normal habit, and that they do not need to be ashamed of it," it reads.

They argue only that parents should ensure their kids use porn in moderation.

The College Fix provided experts to counter those destructive opinions. Clinical social worker Brandy Steelhammer advises parents to stay calm yet firm when discussing sex so that children will know "private parts are so special they need to stay private."

"Remember that children don’t think about sex in the same way adults do. When you find your child behaving sexually, do not assign your thoughts about sex to what you see your child doing," Steelhammer explains.

Other topics on SexInfo’s main page include "situational homosexuality," "fetishistic transvestism," and sexting.

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