Book Review: Dr. Jordan Peterson's '12 Rules For Life: An Antidote To Chaos'

Clinical psychologist and University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson has exploded into popularity over the last year as a result of his unflinching opposition to Canada’s anti-free speech laws and the posting of many of his lectures online.

Peterson has recently published his second nonfiction book, "12 Rules For Life: An Antidote To Chaos," which covers ethical principles and offers basic advice on living in the modern world. "These lessons are what the great stories and myths have been telling us since civilization began," writes Peterson.

The self-help-style book gives some simple, but much-needed ideals for this generation. Each chapter begins with a rule, followed by an explanation of how it could impact your life.

For example, Rule 3 is "Make friends with people who want the best for you." In the chapter, Peterson discusses relationships and how they can affect your life in a positive or a negative way. He gives personal examples from his own life and how they worked out for him. It is funny at times, pointed at others, and hard-hitting just when it needs to be.

Dr. Peterson's brilliance is evident on every page. Though his writing is deep, it is clear, direct, and accessible reading for anyone who is looking to bring some order in their life — a welcome respite in the storm of politically correct works that so often focus on useless platitudes and slogans.

This is the second book by Dr. Peterson; his first book, "Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief" (1999), dives into why people construct complex belief systems.

For more information, check out Dr. Peterson’s interview with Ben Shapiro:

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