Thousands Of Jeremy Corbyn Fans Sign On To Anti-Semitic Open Letter

The letter called a protest against Corbyn's own anti-Semitism the work of a "very powerful special interest group."

More than two thousand people signaled their approval on an "open letter" to British Labor Party leader Jeremy Corbyn, suggesting that a "very powerful special interest group" (the Jewish people, of course) was behind rampant criticism that Corbyn is anti-Semitic, and supportive of anti-Semitic views within his party.

The open letter, posted to Facebook by "Frances Naggs," to a group called “We Support Jeremy Corbyn,” is very clearly claiming Jews were behind a series of protests aimed at Corbyn in recent weeks over his unwillingness to address anti-Semitism within his Party, and his expressed support for a clearly anti-Semitic mural depicting Jewish caricatures playing Monopoly on the backs of "oppressed people."

He's also under fire for the actions of his close aide, who defended a colleague who called the Holocaust a "hoax," while serving on a "Disputes Panel," whose job it is to investigate allegations of anti-Semitism.

Naggs writes that he or she is willing to support Corbyn through the "full onslaught of a very powerful special interest group mobilising its apparent, immense strength" and its “history and influence” to “employ the full might of the BBC."

Two thousand people "reacted" to the post, signaling their support. Not a single member of the page suggested that the post was very clearly anti-Semitic, nor asked Naggs to pull it down.

Naggs goes on to pledge: "But, and it is a very big BUT, we live in a democracy, a one member one vote democracy and no special interest group, regardless of their history or influence, can be allowed to dictate who the rest of us can vote for or how we vote.”

According to the UK's Independent, Corbyn began offering tepid responses to the allegations against him on Monday, suggesting that “anti-Semitic attitudes have surfaced more often in our ranks in recent years” and claiming that he and party leaders have "been too slow in processing some of the cases that have emerged."

But Corbyn neither apologized for his own actions — or those of his aide — and did not provide any suggestions on how he would deal with anti-Semitism. He merely offered platitudes, saying, “I am sincerely sorry for the pain which has been caused, and pledge to redouble my efforts to bring this anxiety to an end.”

He says he will conduct an "urgent meeting" on the issue, but none has been calendared.

 
 
 

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