WATCH: Hillary's Response When Asked About Ivanka Trump Being First Female President

Senator Hillary Clinton attends the LA Promise Fund's Girls Build Leadership Summit at Los Angeles Convention Center on December 15, 2017 in Los Angeles, California.
Araya Diaz/WireImage

Hillary Clinton is clearly not a big fan of the idea of Ivanka Trump succeeding where she failed. In an interview last week with Dutch reporter Eva Jinek, Clinton was quick to dismiss the notion of Ivanka becoming the first female president.

"Apparently Ivanka Trump wants to be the first female President of the United States," said Jinek.

"That's not going to happen," Clinton replied, her nodding head coming to an abrupt stop when she delivered the confident assertion.

"No?" Jinek replied.

"No," said a stone-faced Clinton.

"How come?" asked Jinek, who made clear that she shares Clinton's perspective on the idea of "President Ivanka."

Clinton then presumed to channel "we" the American people. "We don’t want any more inexperienced Trumps in the White House," she said.

"I think that normally I would like to believe what you're saying, but I've also learned after these elections that things that we don’t expect to happen sometimes do happen," said Jinek.

"Well, that’s true, but you know, fool me once shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me," said Clinton. "And I think the American people have seen for themselves what happens when a reality TV candidate wins, and I really believe there’s an enormous amount of pent-up energy to take the country back, away from the Trump administration. And I believe we really have a very good chance of winning the House of Representatives, which will begin the process of righting the ship of state."

WATCH (h/t The Daily Caller):

In the interview, Jinek also asked Clinton why she thinks people "dislike" her. She responded by saying she has been the victim of years of "relentless, ridiculous, false" attacks on her.

Clinton has come under fire over the last week for disparaging female voters. "We do not do well with white men and we don’t do well with married, white women," said Clinton. "And part of that is an identification with the Republican Party, and a sort of ongoing pressure to vote the way that your husband, your boss, your son, whoever, believes you should." Clinton has since issued a pseudo-apology, saying she was sorry that some "misunderstood" her statements.

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