A newly released video shows Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin hilariously mocking a group of triggered University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) students, who repeatedly heckled him during a speech he gave on the economy at the university in February.

Mnuchin was met with hissing from a group of students attending the speech; the snowflakes even hissed the utterance of his name when he was being introduced to the crowd.

According to CNBC, "three different women shouted at him and were either carried or escorted out of the room by police after they ignored warnings to stop" just seven minutes into his remarks.

Incredibly, the women booted from the speech complained about the U.S. supposedly bullying North Korea. Yes, North Korea.

Instead of ignoring the childlike behavior, however, Mnuchin repeatedly mocked their tantrums by pointing out what exactly the students were heckling to highlight the absurdity of their "protests."

For example, when the treasury secretary was met with hissing for discussing the portion of his job which concerns sanctions, he replied, "You're going to hiss about sanctions? We shouldn't have sanctions? You guys are okay with all the oppression and everything going on in the world?"

For the perpetually offended do not know what they hiss!

In another example, Mnuchin earned childlike hissing for discussing the development of incentives for businesses in local communities to create a "positive impact."

"You don't want a positive impact on communities? Like, who hissed?" asked the treasury secretary. "Can I at least get a hand on who hissed on that one?"

"I think you're full of s***!" shouted one heckling audience member.

Mnuchin replied, "If you think I've got nothing to say, maybe you should just leave."

Such open-mindedness and civility on campuses today.

According to CNBC, the video was first withheld from release by the university because Mnuchin "subsequently withdrew" consent for the video to be publicly posted.

"The decision to withhold the video drew criticism from students, free speech groups and members of the news media. Several organizations, including The Associated Press, filed public-records requests arguing for the video to be released," reports CNBC.

On Friday, the university released the video and a statement which indicated Mnuchin's consent.

WATCH (relevant comments begin at the 9-minute mark):