On Monday, British Prime Minister Theresa May minced no words about the poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal, 66, and his daughter, Yulia, 33, who were found slumped on a bench in Salisbury on March 4. May told members of Parliament that it was "highly likely" Russia was responsible for the attack, adding that if there is no "credible response" by the end of Tuesday, the United Kingdom would conclude there had been an "unlawful use of force" by Moscow.

The Skripals were poisoned by a military-grade nerve agent known as Novichok. A police officer who came into contact with the poison, Detective Sgt. Nick Bailey, was hospitalized.

May said, "Either this was a direct action by the Russian state against our country, or the Russian government lost control of its potentially catastrophically damaging nerve agent and allowed it to get into the hands of others." May said Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said Moscow must provide "full and complete disclosure" of the Novichok program to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. She said that she had decided to identify Russia as the entity responsible for the attacks based on "Russia's record of conducting state-sponsored assassinations and our assessment that Russia views some defectors as legitimate targets for assassinations.”

Sergei Skripal was convicted by the Russian government of giving information to MI6 in 2004, but was traded as part of a “spy swap” in 2010.

But Labour Leader and vehement socialist Jeremy Corbin, who has a history of trafficking with Russian agents, attacked May rather than Russia, rasping, “We need to continue seeking a robust dialogue with Russia on all the issues dividing our countries, both domestic and international — rather than simply cutting off contact and simply letting tensions and divisions get worse, and potentially even more dangerous.”

He continued by trying to move away from the issue at hand:

We’re all familiar with the way huge fortunes, often acquired in the most dubious circumstances in Russia, sometimes connected with criminal elements, have ended up sheltering in London and trying to buy political influence in British party politics. Meddling in elections, as the Prime Minister put it, and there has been over £800,000 worth of donations to the Conservative Party from Russian oligarchs and their associates.

Conservative MPS shouted at Corbyn, “Shame!” and “Disgrace!”