In his last column for The New York Times, public editor Arthur Brisbane said that liberalism "virtually bleeds through the fabric of The Times," adding that reporters approach some liberal issues, such as gay marriage and the Occupy movement, "more like causes than news subjects."

But Jill Abramson, then the Times executive editor, said not so. "In our newsroom we are always conscious that the way we view an issue in New York is not necessarily the way it is viewed in the rest of the country or world," she told Politico in 2012. And she said she sought to follow the pledge of a former executive editor to keep the paper "straight."

Of course, you know that's a crock. The once-great paper is heavily skewed to the left, giving Democrats a pass on everything while hammering away at conservatives and Republicans. That liberal bias in the age of President Trump has prompted some journalists, as veteran reporter Bob Woodward said, to become “emotionally unhinged.”

And that now includes Jill Abramson.

"It’s easy to look at what’s happening in Washington DC and despair," she wrote in a piece for The Guardian. "That’s why I carry a little plastic Obama doll in my purse. I pull him out every now and then to remind myself that the United States had a progressive, African American president until very recently. Some people find this strange, but you have to take comfort where you can find it in Donald Trump’s America."


In her piece, Abramson discussed a so-called “Trump rebellion,” asserting that Democrats — who got crushed in the 2016 elections and the GOP controls the White House and both chambers of Congress — are coming on strong. And she said Democrats have a good shot to take back the White House in 2020.

"Though winning control of the House of Representatives in 2018 is their focus, my Democratic sources say that there are already 20 credible presidential challengers giving serious thought to opposing Donald Trump in 2020. The list, unsurprisingly, includes a raft of Democratic senators, and, perhaps surprisingly, at least three strong women, New York’s Kirsten Gillibrand, Minnesota’s Amy Klobuchar and Massachusetts’s Elizabeth Warren," she wrote.

Dream on, Jill.