BOOK REVIEW: Crisis of Responsibility

Our Cultural Addiction to Blame and How You Can Cure It.

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David L. Bahnsen's new book, "Crisis of Responsibility," takes direct aim at a plague that has been affecting our society for much of history, especially for the last few decades in our country: playing victim.

The book, endorsed by many prominent conservatives such as Jonah Goldberg, Rich Lowry and Victor Davis Hanson, among others, tackles possibly the most rampant negatives of human nature: shirking responsibility and blaming others for one's problems. Each chapter tackles an aspect of the way to take responsibility for your actions and circumstances and, in turn, have a better chance at success and happiness.

Bahsen speaks about classic examples of the receivers of blame, from Wall Street to the media, among others. He also talks about the problem of college safe spaces, which are, arguably, the epitome of self-proclaimed victimhood. There is also a section about how big government solutions cause more problems than they solve, further strengthening the victim mentality.

Toward the end, Bahnsen lays out a blueprint for overcoming the victim mentality with "a vision for a free and virtuous society." He states that our culture's foundation is composed of the ambition of the human spirit, and that we can restore the notion of individual responsibility to our culture if we end what he calls "the blame game." Bahnsen also states that his book's purpose is to "correct the false narrative that every impediment to prosperity is caused by some unfair, undefined, uncontrollable external force."

In short, no matter what happens, whether in the economy or environment, we must continue to do whatever we can to do our best to succeed.

This is a great message to send to a society that truly needs it.

Bahsen's book can be found on Amazon.



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