While the media is pushing hard for gun control in the wake of the tragic mass shooting in Florida, using a small number of kids as political props, another survivor of a school shooting is pushing hard in the opposite direction.

Colorado House Minority Leader Patrick Neville, who survived the 1999 Columbine High School shooting in Colorado, has introduced legislation to remove restrictions on concealed carry in schools, The Washington Times reported.

Under current Colorado law, anyone who has a concealed carry permit "may bring firearms onto school property, but must keep them locked inside their vehicles."

Neville, though, believes that it is time to arm teachers so they can act during a school shooting.

“This act would allow every law-abiding citizens who holds a concealed carry permit, issued from their chief law-enforcement officer, the right to carry concealed in order to defend themselves and most importantly our children from the worst-case scenarios,” Neville wrote in a statement.

“As a former Columbine student who was a sophomore during the shootings on April 20, 1999, I will do everything in my power to prevent Colorado families from enduring the hardships my classmates and I faced that day,” the Republican lawmaker wrote. “Time and time again we point to the one common theme with mass shootings, they occur in gun-free zones.”