Actress Rachel Weisz ("The Mummy") will not be waving pom-poms for team "Jane Bond" anytime soon and rejects the politically correct notion that the famed MI6 agent, James Bond, should get a sex-change operation to appease feminists who prefer to leach off a successful franchise rather than invent their own character.

Speaking with The Telegraph, Weisz, whose husband Daniel Craig has played the character for the franchise's past three entries, said "no" to the question on whether a femme should replace 007. Her reasoning: women deserve their own characters.

“[Fleming] devoted an awful lot of time to writing this particular character, who is particularly male and relates in a particular way to women,“ she said. "Why not create your own story rather than jumping on to the shoulders and being compared to all those other male predecessors? Women are really fascinating and interesting and should get their own stories.”

That makes perfect sense. Casting a woman in the role of James Bond sends the message that women can only headline action films if a male set the stage for them to take over. Frankly, that's just insulting and smacks in the face of reality. Feminists advocating for a female James Bond seem to have forgotten the success enjoyed by "Aliens," "Kill Bill," "The Hunger Games," "The Long Kiss Goodnight," and, yes, "Wonder Woman," without having a man precede them in the roles. The upcoming film "Red Sparrow" with Jennifer Lawrence tells the story of a Bond-like secret agent, and if successful, feminists could finally have their female James Bond.

SJW's have also advocated for a black James Bond, and that also should not be done for precisely the same reasons that Bond should not be female. As "Black Panther" will show the world this coming weekend, not to mention "Blade" and all things Will Smith, black men are perfectly capable of heading a successful franchise without filling a white man's shoes.

Speaking with Variety at the Sundance Film Festival, actor Idris Elba reflected on the future identity of James Bond, suggesting that he could be anything.

“Are we interested in having a Bond character other than being a male?” Elba asked. “It could be a woman, could be a black woman, could be a white woman, but I think, that character, everybody would like to see it have — do something different with it, why not?”

As both Marvel and "Ghostbusters" recently learned, changing characters around in beloved franchises to support a social justice cause always backfires in the end. Best always to get creative and present new and innovative ideas.