On Sunday, The New York Times gushed over Kim Yo-jong, the sister of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, as she appeared at the Olympic Games in South Korea, writing, “Flashing a sphinx-like smile and without ever speaking in public, Ms. Kim managed to outflank Mr. Trump’s envoy to the Olympics, Vice President Mike Pence, in the game of diplomatic image-making.”

The Times wasn’t done, adding, “Commentators analyzed her no-nonsense hairstyle and dress, her low-key makeup and the sprinkle of freckles on her cheeks. … Her quietly friendly approach while in South Korea — photographers repeatedly captured her smiling — seemed to endear her to some observers.”

For the Times to laud the representative of the world’s most repressive regime is not surprising, considering its history. As for Kim Jong Un, Fox News reported last August, “Kim's uncle, Jang Song Thaek, was executed in 2013 when he was accused of being a ‘traitor’ and committing a series of ‘hideous crimes.’ His exiled half-brother, Kim Jong Nam, died this year when two women smeared his face with the banned VX nerve agent in Kuala Lumpar airport in Malaysia.” Kim Jong Un’s brutality with his own people is commonly acknowledged; a December 2016 report alleged that he had ordered 340 people to be executed since he came to power in 2011.

For a comprehensive piece on the murderous North Korean regime, see Matt Walsh here.

But praising murderous dictators and their cohorts is nothing new for the Times; witness this puff piece the Times wrote about Adolf Hitler 10 days before World War II erupted:

And lest we forget, there was the infamous reporting of the Times on Josef Stalin that whitewashed that dictator in the 1930s.

The New York Times’ motto, “All The News That’s Fit To Print,” seems eminently accurate, if by “fit” you mean news that is antithetical to the cause of human freedom.