According to the mainstream media, all of America hates President Trump and his Republican Party is going to lose all of its seats in the House, which after the 2018 election will be 435-0 for the Democrats.

But, like everything else the MSM says, that isn't exactly the case. The Republican National Committee just announced that it raised nearly $133 million in 2017 — setting a record for fundraising in an off-election year.

That $133 million number is more than twice what the Democratic National Committee raised last year.

RNC Chairman Ronna McDaniel said the massive influx of cash from supporters shows that Republicans and conservative voters are optimistic about Trump's agenda so far and want to help him fulfill his campaign promises.

"In his first year, President Trump delivered a historic tax cut to the middle-class, slashed regulations, and grew our economy. We look forward to electing more Republican leaders to Congress who will support President Trump's winning agenda on behalf of the American people," she said.

By the numbers, the RNC said it has some $40 million on hand, while the DNC has less than $7 million available — plus $6 million in debt.

It's already been a tough year for the Democrats. The top DNC official was ousted less than a year on the job after the party continued to struggle financially, something that many top Democrats have warned will cause significant problems for them in the 2018 midterms.

Jess O'Connell, the former EMILY's List Executive Director, took over the DNC as CEO in May 2017 after the party endured multiple special election losses to the Republicans and as Clinton-loyalist Tom Perez took over as the new chairman, NBC News reported.

O'Connell's decision is reportedly "a personal one," NBC reports, citing an unnamed DNC official. The timing was intended to "cause minimal disruption ahead of November's midterm elections," but NBC notes that it comes on the heels of the DNC booting its finance director "following a period of weak fundraising, as well as a shakeup last year that reignited tensions with Sanders' allies."