First Lady Melania Trump made a grand entrance into her husband's first State of the Union address last night wearing an ivory pantsuit by Christian Dior, a white Dolce & Gabbana blouse, and a pair of nude Christian Louboutin court shoes — a statement outfit that set her apart in a sea of muted colors and dark suits.

The media was quick to notice that Melania wasn't dressed like the rest of the crowd, but instead of attributing the former model's chic choices to superior taste or on-the-nose fashion sense, they were quick to assume Melania Trump's suit was a statement of a different kind — a racist one.

MSNBC's Sally Kohn led the way with the kind of witty observation that's become her trademark.

In case Sally's brand of humor is lost on you, dear reader, she's implying that Melania is dressed like she's about to attend a particularly high-end cross burning with the rest of the KKK, and that her all-white outfit is a nod to Trump's "alt-right" fans (which, according to Sally, is a group that probably includes everyone to the right of Jane Fonda).

Once Kohn realized her joke had fallen flat, she made a vain attempt to apologize, criticizing conservatives for their lack of a sense of humor — because there's nothing funnier than implying the First Lady leads a racist cabal.

Of course, Sally was oddly silent when Hillary Clinton sported the same look, though perhaps that was because Hillary Clinton bought off-the-rack.

Somewhat less incendiary were the folks at CNN, who insisted that Melania Trump was dressed in a color used previously to protest the president, and that it was a silent statement in opposition to her husband. They tried desperately to connect it to Melania's use of a separate motorcade from the president, even though Melania arrived at the State of the Union early for a private reception with the president's guests.

“You know, she’s wearing a cream-colored suit there, which I find interesting. Remember last year, the female Democratic Senators all wore white, a bunch of them to protest Trump’s policies against women. There was even a hashtag, women wear white,” CNN reporter Kate Bennett mused. “Listen, it could be a total coincidence, but I just find a lot of the stuff she does these days, to look at it twice.”

If it was a protest, it could easily have been against Democratic women who, this year, wore black and accessorized with "Time's Up" pins to protest Trump and stand in solidarity with female victims of sexual harassment.

Of course, CNN's (and Sally Kohn's and The New York Times') analysis seems to ignore that Trump dressed in several shades, none of which were truly white. Her suit was cream. Her shirt was a bit off-white. Her shoes were nude. A former fashion model would never wear plain white after Labor Day.