The ACLU is now fighting to have the comprehensive sex education standards implemented in California foisted upon schoolchildren in grades K-12 across the nation.

In an article posted on the ACLU’s website, Melissa Goodman, director of the LGBTQ, Gender and Reproductive Justice Project, ACLU of Southern California, lauds the California Healthy Youth Act, implemented in 2015 and sponsored by the ACLU of California, among others. She writes approvingly, “The law aims to minimize gender and sexual orientation bias and stereotyping as well as foster a positive and healthy attitude toward sexuality.”

Goodman rips what she feels was the antiquated sex education she learned in middle school, asserting:

For one week, a very uncomfortable health/gym teacher taught me about body parts and reproduction, that sex — always heterosexual — can lead to pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, and that we should therefore abstain from sex or use condoms. … What I didn’t learn was key information and skills that would have equipped me to have healthy relationships. I didn’t learn about gender and power.

Goodman continues by noting the recent focus on sexual harassment, then adding, “To stop the objectification of women and power imbalance that fuels this societal epidemic, we need to start long before anyone enters the workplace. If we want to be serious about making long-term cultural change to stop sexual harassment and violence, we should provide comprehensive sex ed in all of our schools.”

Goodman is absolutely giddy about the way the discussion of “gender” has become standard, noting:

In 2011, dozens of experts came together to develop the first national learning standards for sexual health education. The standards are the “essential minimum” age-appropriate core content for K-12 students. They recommend students learn information and usable skills about identity and bias because it impacts how we feel about ourselves and how we interact with each other. This includes cultural gender roles, gender stereotyping, gender nonconformity, gender identity, and sexual orientation.

It seems that Goodman wants to make sure young children should know all about gender issues while they are still totally malleable; she writes: “Teaching this kind of comprehensive sex ed can have real impacts. A recent global study that included the United States shows that young people firmly believe and act upon gender stereotypes by at least age 10.”

And, of course, there is the typical anti-religious perspective on abstinence: “Abstinence-only education is a proven failure and frequently reinforces gender stereotypes that play out in our behavior.”

Welcome to the brave new world, children, where sex is condoned as you grow up and “gender” is the avenue for leftists to destroy whatever vestiges of traditional morality that are still extant.