Despite failing to come even close in any way whatsoever to the Time's Up movement's goal for "gender equity," the 60th Grammy Awards this Sunday gave a lot of lip service to the feminist movement. Along with all the expected anti-Trump messaging came a surprise cameo appearance by none other than twice-failed presidential candidate and original figurehead of the #Resistance, Hillary Clinton. Though no one tuned in to watch, Clinton's cameo turned out to be exceptionally bad timing.

Clinton appeared via video to read a passage from the debunked anti-Trump White House book, "Fire and Fury," penned by expert muckraker Michael Wolff. Here's the moment:

In a night in which the spirit of #MeToo loomed over the event and several performers spoke out in solidarity with the Time's Up movement, having Clinton, of all people, appear on the big screen was not the best idea. If her infamous treatment of the female accusers of her husband were not enough to discourage her appearance this year, over the last few days another #MeToo-related scandal from Clinton's past emerged.

The New York Times reported last week that Clinton allowed a man she described as her "faith advisor," Burns Strider (yes, that's his real name), stay on her 2008 campaign despite multiple allegations of sexual misconduct leveled against him by female staffers. Though Clinton was advised to boot him off the campaign, she chose instead to "protect" him.

For his alleged bad behavior, Strider was simply demoted and, according to a report published by BuzzFeed the day before the Grammys, went on to thrive in Hillary's campaign:

Senior aides on the campaign wanted to fire him, according to three officials with knowledge of the process, but Hillary Clinton decided against doing so.

Not only was the adviser, Burns Strider, not pushed out — he thrived after her campaign, landing a senior role at a super PAC preparing for her next presidential bid. In that job, he exhibited the same kinds of inappropriate behavior toward women who worked there, particularly two young female subordinates, they said.

In at least three separate instances between 2007 and 2015, women who worked for the Clinton campaign or the pro-Clinton PAC said that Strider, 52, harassed them at work.

All along, even after his departure from that super PAC, he was described in the press as a close friend and confidant to Clinton, someone with access to one of the most important people in the country. In meetings, he would refer to the “boss lady” and what she wanted done — a sign to people in the extended Clinton orbit that he wielded influence, especially in the eyes of the young staffers who hoped to work for the first woman president.

Clinton has been much-criticized for her treatment of her husband's long list of accusers, whom the former First Lady did not believe deserved to be "heard" when it was politically inconvenient to do so. So, yeah, maybe Clinton wasn't the best choice for a guest appearance at the 2018 "Time's Up" Grammys.

Related: OOPS: Grammys Fail #TimesUp Big Time

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H/T John Sexton