BOMBSHELL: Other Suspects Under Investigation In Las Vegas Massacre

"There are charges being investigated."

Up until Tuesday, the public has been told that the massacre in Las Vegas on October 1 was perpetrated by a lone gunman, although there have been numerous aspects of the case that have remained unexplained. Sheriff Joe Lombardo and the FBI attested that evidence indicated Stephen Paddock acted alone.

But on Tuesday, inside a district courtroom, according to Fox 5 Las Vegas, an attorney for various media outlets argued that releasing information relating to the massacre was critical in order for Las Vegas residents to heal from the tragedy. The lawyer for Las Vegas Metro Police, Nicholas Crosby, later admitted something that was a bombshell revelation: other suspects are under investigation. Criminal charges may be filed in the coming weeks in the investigation into the Las Vegas massacre, the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history.

The Daily Mail reported that Clark County District Court Judge Elissa Cadish asked Crosby, "Without naming names, there are potential charges against others as a result of the ongoing investigation?"

"Yes," Crosby replied, "There are charges being investigated."

A spokesperson for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said they are "investigating possible criminal charges related to items discovered during the service of search warrants."

Law enforcement officials still have not released any information about a possible motive for the October 1, 2017 massacre that left 58 dead and approximately 500 more injured.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reported the following statistics from the FBI's investigation:

  • 400 specialists brought in
  • 1500 leads followed locally, 500 worldwide
  • 40 terabytes of data collected
  • 22,000 hours of video collected
  • 250,000 images collected
  • 14 days to comb through the 15-acre festival site
  • 13 days to collect evidence inside Mandalay Bay
  • 12 federal search warrants filed
  • 500 grand jury subpoenas issued

FBI Special Agent in Charge Aaron Rouse said in December that they have interviewed more than 400 people worldwide in the investigation to learn "as much as we possibly can about why the subject did what they did."

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