Weinstein Victims Say They Weren't Invited To The Golden Globes, Despite Leading The #MeToo Movement

Rose McGowan and Asia Argento weren't extended an invitation, or asked to sign the "Time's Up" letter.

They are responsible for taking down perhaps one of the most powerful men in the entertainment industry, and without them, the #MeToo movement might have completely fizzled like so many modern feminist social media efforts. But Rose McGowan and Asia Argento say that they haven't been asked to join the super-woke Hollywood women's movement to end sexual harassment and violence.

Writing on Twitter, both McGowan and Argento said they weren't invited to accompany the "Times Up" actresses on the red carpet, although A-listers like Reese Witherspoon and Meryl Street brought social justice warriors — and even the "leader" of the #MeToo movement — as their guests.

And despite being the women most visibly affected by the Hollywood code of silence, at least Argento says that she was never asked to be a part of the "Time's Up" movement that claimed to speak for all entertainment industry women pursuing equality and workplace safety standards.

"I can only speak for myself but not only I wasn’t invited to the #GoldenGlobes: nobody asked my opinion about #TIMESUP or to sign the letter,” Argento tweeted out after the Globes concluded. “I support @TIMESUPNOW even though I was excluded from it. Guess I am not POWERFUL or HOLLYWOOD enough. Proud to work behind the scenes.”

The two women communicated over social media, offering support to each other even if they weren't receiving it from the women who claimed to be at the forefront of the equality movement.

“No one should forget that you were the first one who broke the silence. Anyone who tries to diminish your work is a troll and an enemy of the movement. You gave me the courage to speak out. I am on your side until I die," Argento tweeted to McGowan.

“And not one of those fancy people wearing black to honor our rapes would have lifted a finger had it not been so. I have no time for Hollywood fakery, but you I love, @AsiaArgento," McGowan replied.

Rosanna Arquette, another one of Weinstein's accusers, was more pointed. " “No we weren’t invited. Annabella [Sciorra], Daryl [Hannah], Mira [Sorvino] … none of us were," she said.

Argento, however, was the one who summed it up most effectively, claiming that the group was deliberately excluded because real victims just aren't glamorous enough for the red carpet — everything about "Time's Up" has to be heavily orchestrated and sanitized.

“It would have been too much of a downer… an embarrassment,” Argento wrote. “Victims aren’t glamorous enough.”

The New York Post reached out to the actresses to determine whether they really weren't invited — it seems shocking that the women responsible for igniting the #MeToo movement, even if they weren't officially the founders, weren't invited. After all, among the accused entertainment industry bigwigs, Weinstein and Kevin Spacey (whose accusers also were not at the Golden Globes) are the both the most notorious and the movement's biggest scalps.

If they truly weren't invited — and it seems, by all accounts, that they weren't — it's yet another dent in the theory that Hollywood's A-list female stars are truly taking the issue of women's rights in their own industry seriously. The black gowns and the lapel pins are merely a facade, a way of expressing surface-level support while the issue of sexual harassment and sexual abuse is a hot topic, but not a serious commitment to any real change.

Although they're happy to confront E! hosts about a pay dispute red carpet hosts are neither responsible for, nor have any power over, and spout long-debunked myths about the "wage gap" in softball interviews with entertainment reporters whose experience in economic policy is either skin deep or non-existent, standing next to a real victim is much harder.

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