American feminist groups are gearing up for a repeat of last year's "Women's March," but as their sisters take to the streets to protest a truly oppressive, fundamentalist government, seeking true equal rights, American feminist organizations are — disgustingly — silent.

The symbol of the Iranian freedom protests, this time around, is even a woman who threw off her veil in front of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard, and stood defiantly as freedom fighters massed around her.

That's not a white flag. That's her torn off headscarf.

True feminists should be rallying to these women's cause; after all, the fight for global equality isn't about cheaper tampons or correct pronouns or poorly knitted pussy hats. It's about making sure the world is safe for women to truly be equal to men, and the Islamic fundamentalist country of Iran has, for decades, kept women as second class citizens, dictating what they can wear, whom they can communicate with, and what they can do with their lives.

But while women in Iran are fighting for their freedom, the leaders of the women's rights movement in America have . . . other priorities.

Moms Rising, a group of "progressive, feminist" parents who organize mostly using Twitter, is talking about a clean DREAM Act, hosting a seminar on reducing sugar, and touting their own "impact" on 2017 (since Donald Trump is still in office, and the Republicans passed comprehensive tax reform, that "impact" appears minimal).

The National Organization of Women (NOW) isn't talking about how to help male protesters as the government cracks down on social media in Iran. Nope — it's bellyaching about Betsy DeVos, as is the National Women's Law Center. The American Association of University Women, which is dedicated to the "advancement" of women worldwide, hasn't even tweeted a photo of women in the streets of Iran, despite the clear need for support for their "advancement." They're talking about a "pay gap" that may or may not exist.

And what about those Women's Marchers? Those pussy-hatted progressives, determined to fight in the streets for equality, who said they stood for freedom across the globe, as cataloged in nearly a dozen Nelson Mandela quotes tweeted by their members this year alone? Where are those great champions of women?

Nowhere to be found. Their Twitter feed is one, giant advertisement for an upcoming conference in Las Vegas. They're begging for pre-orders for their "Together We Rise" book as women beg in the streets of Iran to be treated as humans.

It's just as well. Linda Sarsour, one of the Women's March leaders, has spent the last year trying to claim that hijabs are a symbol of "empowerment"; it would be tough for the Marchers to continue to promote their propaganda as women in Iran throw their headscarves off in the streets as a symbol of their own freedom.

Sarsour herself spent the day tweeting about Trump's travel ban.