She said what?!

Hilary Rosen, a CNN guest contributor, fired out a bizarre post on Twitter on Saturday. Rosen criticized a fan at a Georgetown University basketball game against Syracuse University because he was wearing a bacon suit.

Yes, a jacket and pair of shorts that looked like bacon.

“Look at the guy in the ‘bacon suit,’” Rosen wrote Saturday in a since-deleted tweet accompanied by a photo of Bakan at the game, the New York Post reported. “This is a Georgetown #Hoyas fans anti-Semitic smear to the Syracuse team.”

Say what now?

Syracuse University has about 6,700 students, of which some 1,850 are Jewish, according to Hillel International. That makes the university No. 6 in Hillel's "Top 60 Private Universities by Jewish Population."

Rosen wasn't done. She shot out another accusation and the horrible offender after Syracuse won, writing, “Hey bacon-man. #Syracuse for the win. Bigots lose. Bye #Hoyas #Cuse.”

But that "bigot" is just a guy, a guy named Michael Bakan. We know you're ahead of us here: His name is pronounced like the wonderful breakfast meat — bacon. He wears the costume to lots of events.

Bakan and several of his friends took to the social-media platform later in the day to point out she was jumping to conclusions.

“Hey, it’s ‘bacon man.’ It’s actually Mr. Bakan — pronounced ‘bacon.’ Just a fun costume,” Bakan tweeted at Rosen.

Rosen tried to save her own bacon by claiming she was given some bad intel.

“Awesome, u found me!” she tweeted to Bakan. “Thanks for telling me. I’m new to this school rivalry and got some bad info! I apologize and took down my tweet.”

Rosen never clarified what “bad info” she got about the legendary ‘Cuse-Georgetown rivalry or how it had to do with Judaism.

Syracuse is known for fielding some Jewish basketball players including Danny Schayes, who played in the NBA from 1981 to 1999 and was part of an Anti-Defamation League ad campaign with the tagline, “If you really believe in America, prejudice is foul play!” Former player Tamir Goodman also has been dubbed the “Jewish Jordan,” and Jewish Coaches Association founder Bernie Fine was an assistant coach on the team for 35 seasons.

Rosen often pops off for no reason. In 2012, she accused Ann Romney, wife of then-presidential candidate Mitt Romney, of having “never worked a day in her life” because she is a homemaker. She apologized in a way only liberals can get away with: "Let's declare peace in this phony war and go back to focus on the substance."

But hey, just some "bad info" — whatever that means.