Al Sharpton Threatens Jefferson Memorial: An 'Insult To My Family'

"You have private museums..."

Rev. Al Sharpton, the man who told Jews to "pin their yarmulkes back and come over to my house," lamented to Charlie Rose about the pain he feels over the Jefferson Memorial, calling it an "insult to my family." Many Jews would probably say the same thing about seeing the man who sparked a riot in 1991 that led to the death of one Jewish student be given a platform on national television, including his own show on MSNBC.

Speaking with Charlie Rose about the current SJW trend across the country in which packs of angry marauders destroy public property by tearing down Confederate monuments, Al Sharpton, of course, endorsed the monuments' removal. When Rose shifted the argument to the Jefferson Memorial, Sharpton put the former president on notice.

"When you look at the fact that public monuments are supported by public funds, you’re asking me to subsidize the insult of my family," Sharpton said. "I would repeat that the public should not be paying to uphold somebody who has had that kind of background. You have private museums, you have other things that you may want to do there."

Except you cannot just put the Jefferson Memorial in a museum. It's its own museum, it's its own structure. What on earth is he talking about? Does he really want to take a bulldozer to this?

Sharpton, however, provided an interesting glimpse behind the curtain regarding President Trump's response to the attack in Charlottesville. Recalling his own days of dealing with "extremists" that resorted to violence on his watch, Sharpton seemed to reveal a guilty conscience.

"In my own career wrestled, you’ve got to deal openly and say, 'no, I’m not gonna be with those elements, I’m not going to deal with violence,'" he said. "I've had to deal with that. I'm not saying anything that a lot of public officials haven’t had to struggle with, which is why I’m saying, he knows better. Every one of us knows when you're around extremists that you need to say, 'Wait a minute, I'm going to part company.'"

But Sharpton never really parted company with the "extremists" in his ranks, at least not in his rhetoric. He has always engaged in extreme rhetoric that divides white and black Americans by playing on the same identity politics the alt-right has adopted.

His role in the 1991 Crown Heights riots was riling up a mad mob with Jew hatred after a black youth was accidentally killed by a Jew driving a car. He said this at the black youth's funeral: "Talk about how Oppenheimer in South Africa sends diamonds straight to Tel Aviv and deals with the diamond merchants right here in Crown Heights. The issue is not anti-Semitism; the issue is apartheid. ... All we want to say is what Jesus said: If you offend one of these little ones, you got to pay for it. No compromise, no meetings, no coffee klatsch, no skinnin' and grinnin'."

That mob rioted in Crown Heights for three days and murdered a rabbinical student.

The closest Sharpton has ever come to an apology, which was not one, is when he said: "Our language and tone sometimes exacerbated tensions and played to the extremists."

If vandals graffiti "Black Lives Matter" on the Jefferson Memorial tomorrow, well then, "here's looking at you, Sharpton."

Sharpton's interview begins at the 15:30 mark below:

 
 
 

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