Just How Leftist Are This Year's Super Bowl Ads? Check These Out.

As Daily Wire's John Nolte put it, "Super Bowl 51 completes the left's hyper-politicization of absolutely everything." Despite struggling to keep viewers amid changing viewing habits and the insufferable anti-American/anti-police National Anthem protests, the wizards of smart at the NFL decided to go all in on the politics this year.

So the NFL invited outspoken leftist Lady Gaga to lecture viewers about "equality" and "inclusion" — which we all know really means telling Middle America to stop being sexist/racist/xenophobic/Islamophobic and all around ignorant. Then they asked the only cast of a musical in the country that humiliated Vice President Mike Pence, the Hamilton cast, to sing "America the Beautiful." Then there are the ads, which include a super-feminist Audi ad and two immigration lectures.

Ad agency Venables Bell & Partners produced an edgy, angry feminist equal pay/girl power ad for Audi titled "Daughter," premised on all the usual feminist myths about the pay gap and how much America hates women. The only thing missing is any reference to America's mythic "rape culture." Here's how the ad starts:

"What do I tell my daughter? Do I tell her her grandpa is worth more than her grandma? That her dad is worth more than her mom? Do I tell her that despite her education, her drive, her skills, her intelligence, she will automatically be valued as less than every man she meets?"

By the way, the answer to all your questions, narrator guy, is "no" because you've got the wrong country. Set this in the Middle East and now we've got a conversation. Enjoy:

Then there are the not one but two immigration ads. One of them was produced by small Pittsburgh-based shop Brunner for 84 Lumber called "The Journey Begins." The beautifully shot and sentimentally scored mini-film about the long journey of a Spanish-speaking woman and her daughter to America's border, where they apparently plan to illegally cross, ends with their hopes and dreams dashed by Trump's border wall. Seriously.

Fox shot down the original because of the hyper-political ending. In response, CEO Michael Brunner said that his company and 84 Lumber "believe too strongly in that message to leave it on the editing room floor," so they cut a new version and are offering the full version online. The pro-illegal immigration lumber company has reportedly sunk $15 million into the ad.

Glaringly missing from the mini-film is any reference to the network of human smugglers, both freelance and drug cartel-owned, who often take advantage of the immigrants, particularly young females, as was horrifically chronicled over the last few years during the unprecedented influx of unaccompanied minors across the southern border. The ad somehow fails to address how it's not cruel to encourage people to make the perilous trek and then condemn themselves to living the rest of their lives in the shadows.

Budweiser also got in on the pro-immigration/anti-xenophobia debate by producing their "You don't look like you're from around here" ad. Here's how NPR frames the ad:

"You don't look like you're from around here," a young Adolphus Busch is told as he arrives in America from Germany to pursue his dream of making beer. So begins Budweiser's new Super Bowl ad, released earlier this week into an ongoing political maelstrom over immigration.

The ad depicts the company's founder trudging through swamps and mud, surviving a steamboat fire and being greeted with outright hostility before getting to St. Louis and meeting Eberhard Anheuser — i.e., the Anheuser in Anheuser-Busch. Despite the beer giant's protestations that the ad is not political, it has hit a nerve among conservatives for taking a seemingly pro-immigrant stance at a time of widespread protests against President Trump's ban on travelers from seven Muslim-majority nations.

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