Kaepernick Called Out by Reporter for Praising Dictator Fidel Castro. UPDATE: Castro Dead.

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick is back in the news after yet another politically charged statement. In a talk with the Miami media this week, a Cuban reporter called out the National Anthem-protesting player for wearing a T-shirt honoring the brutal communist dictator Fidel Castro. Kaepernick, who has condemned America as systemically racist and thus unworthy of his respect, defended his praise of Castro, who ruled Cuba with an iron fist and destroyed lives and families to maintain his oppressive regime.

Kaepernick's 49ers, who have gone 0 and 5 since he took the reins (to be fair, they only managed one win before he started), are playing the Miami Dolphins this week, giving the Miami media a chance to ask the non-voting quarterback a few questions on Wednesday. One question that resulted in a particularly tense exchange came from a Miami Herald reporter, who the Palm Beach Post notes comes "from a family of Cuban exiles."

The unnamed reporter pressed Kaepernick on his decision to wear a shirt to a press conference back in August depicting Fidel Castro meeting with Malcolm X in 1960 with the caption, "Like minds think alike." According to the Post, Kaepernick initially responded by trying to redirect the conversation to Malcolm X, saying, "I'm not talking about Fidel Castro and his oppression. I’m talking about Malcolm X and what he's done for people."

The Cuban reporter was not going to let him off that easy, however, calling out Kaepernick's attempts to sidestep the "uncomfortable" topic. Kaepernick responded by openly praising Castro, despite having admitted that he had oppressed the Cuban people—and taking another shot at America.

"One thing that Fidel Castro did do is they have the highest literacy rate because they invest more in their education system than they do in their prison system—which we do not do here, even though we’re fully capable of doing that," said Kaepernick.

The reporter replied by underscoring that Castro had broken up families. Kaepernick responded by claiming that America does the exact same thing by arresting criminals, and then jumped back centuries to slam America for past sins.

"We do break up families here. That’s what mass incarceration is. That was the foundation of slavery, so our country has been based on that as well as the genocide of Native Americans," said Kaepernick.

The reporter asked him to clarify if he was really attempting to equate Castro's dictatorial destruction of families with the arrest of criminals.

"I'm equating the breaking up of families with the breaking up of families," replied Kaepernick.

So this is the world of Colin Kaepernick. America, the freest, fairest country in the world, which has made massive progress in race relations over the last half-century, is unworthy of his respect and even participation on the democratic process because it is imperfect. Yet a communist dictator who stomped out any hint of dissent, lining opponents up in front of firing squads, and destroying families, is admirable because he threw some of the money he confiscated from others at education. This is the kind of worldview that results in the wearing of "cops are pigs" socks:

UPDATE: Soon after this piece was published, Cuban state television reported that after maintaining his grip on Cuba for over a half-century—spanning ten American presidential administrations—Fidel Castro died. Daily Wire contributor Michael Knowles provides a summary of some of the human rights atrocities committed by Kaepernick's favorite communist dictator:

It is difficult to calculate how many Cuban political dissidents and innocent civilians Castro killed throughout his fifty-year "revolutionary" reign, but Cuba Archive President Maria Werlau estimates 78,000 innocents have died trying to flee slavery under Castro; 5,300 peasant farmers and their children in the Escambray Mountains and at the Bay of Pigs; 14,000 in Fidel's escapades abroad; 5,600 dissidents in front of firing squads; 1,200 in "extrajudicial assassinations"; and 2,199 documented political prison deaths. Welau notes, however, that these numbers are conservative estimates, and the actual casualties may number an order of magnitude more.

Partial transcript via Washington Post.

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