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Yale Student Railroaded By University Kangaroo Court Is Finally Moving On With His Life

By  Ashe Schow
DailyWire.com
Jack Montague #4 of the Yale Bulldogs during a game against the Harvard Crimson at the Palestra on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania on March 14, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Hunter Martin/Getty Images

False accusations affect different people in different ways. Many students who have been railroaded by their universities after being dubiously accused of sexual assault find it difficult to move on. Some require extensive therapy and medication for depression and anxiety. Many contemplate suicide, feeling their futures are over.

Jack Montague, a former Yale University basketball star, is doing his best to move on from his ordeal and move on with his life. Alice True, who runs a website called Save Our Sons, has posted an update on Montague’s life following his settlement with Yale in June.

“The details of the settlement are confidential but I can tell you that Jack is happy with the deal, and he is deeply thankful for the support he’s received from the public. Although the past few years have been tough on Jack, he’s excited to put this behind him and move on to the next chapter of his life,” True wrote.

She added that Montague has recently graduated from Belmont University with a master’s degree in accounting. Montague also would like to eventually give his account of what he has gone through.

“Unfortunately, the publications that covered the expulsion and campus controversy were mostly silent about the settlement. So, Jack is now forced to rectify his public image and set the record straight. As for his standing with Yale, his status may have been changed to ‘withdrawn’ from the settlement, but because the details are confidential we are in the dark for now,” True wrote.

Montague’s ordeal began in 2015 after he was accused of sexually assaulting a woman with whom he had an ongoing sexual relationship. The two had sex on four separate occasions, and, according to Montague’s lawsuit filed in 2016, the conditions during the fourth encounter were similar to those of the others. But a year later, the woman (who has never been named) claimed the fourth encounter wasn’t consensual, even though she returned to his dorm afterward to share his bed.

During Montague’s legal action with Yale it was discovered that a Yale administrator, David Post, encouraged the accuser to file a formal report. Another administrator, Deputy Title IX coordinator Angela Gleason, falsely claimed to the accuser that a “new development” had come up in the case and that “she would not be able to keep [Roe’s] name confidential” because a previous complaint had been filed against Montague.

The accuser had not wanted Montague punished prior to these claims, but then decided she should file a formal complaint believing Montague had hurt other women.

In reality, there was no “new development.” Montague had previously been cited for a drunken antic involving a rolled up paper plate shoved down a woman’s shirt. The incident was not considered sexual, but Yale did not report this to Montague’s accuser.

True now reports that Gleason was removed as Yale’s Title IX coordinator but was able to move on to Morse College as a dean.

The Yale Daily News, which reported Montague’s story from the insinuation that he was guilty, barely mentioned the settlement and framed it as Yale settling merely due to litigation costs. But, there’s a “silver lining,” True wrote (emphasis original):

Jack’s case will likely be used for future Title IX cases regarding due process. Although Jack’s team was not granted their Title IX discrimination argument, the Spring summary judgment ruling is momentous against such discrimination. Many close to this issue argue that this judge’s ruling was the most favorable ruling given to any student recently involved in a Title IX lawsuit. The judge recognized the lack of impartiality of the UWC hearings and seemed to have a disapproving attitude towards Yale’s actions. His ruling and commentary will most likely be cited in future similar cases.

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