So, Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine is currently under the impression that the terror threat has greatly subsided since President Barack Obama took office.

No, he actually said this… during the one and only 2016 vice presidential debate, on live TV.

When pressed about the undeniable growing terror threat under President Obama’s reign, Kaine argued that the “terrorist threat has decreased,” laying out the killing of bin Laden and the disastrous Iranian nuclear deal as evidence of a safer America.

“The terrorist threat has decreased in some ways because bin Laden is dead,” said Kaine. “[It] has decreased in some ways because the Iranian nuclear weapons program has been stopped. The terrorist threat to United States troops has been decreased in some ways… but there are other parts of the world that are challenging.”

Yeah, except not.

As noted by The Daily Caller:

In the year 2014, a staggering 32,700 people were killed worldwide due to terrorism, more than double the amount killed in 2013 and three times as high as the number of deaths in 2009, when Obama took office. Deaths in 2015 were slightly lower. at 28,328, but that was easily enough to be the second-most this millennium.

While deaths declined slightly worldwide, deaths in the U.S. and Western Europe have remained at their highest since 2001. The past 12 calendar months have seen major attacks in Paris (130 killed), Nice (86 killed), San Bernardino (14 killed), and Orlando (49 killed), along with several smaller incidents.

Of course, the rise of terrorism is, without question, linked to the disastrous foreign policy laid out by the Obama Administration, including—you guessed it—former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, your running mate, Senator Kaine.

The second dumbest thing Kaine uttered during Tuesday night’s debate also dealt with foreign policy. The Virginia senator actually defended the early pull-out of troops in Iraq, which contributed to the rise of ISIS—after blaming it on George W. Bush, of course.

“President Bush said we would leave Iraq at the end of 2011. And, Elaine, Iraq didn't want our troops to stay, and they wouldn't give us the protection for our troops. And guess what? If a nation where our troops are serving does not want us to stay, we're not going to stay without their protection,” said Kaine, with a straight face.