During a speech on Monday regarding terrorism, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke about immigration:

"We want people to come into our country, but they have to come in legally, through a process… No one has a right to immigrate to this country. It is the job of a responsible government to admit only those who expect to succeed and flourish here and really be proud of what they've done and where they came from. They have to love our country."

For Trump, this was a very reasonable and coherent statement. There is no constitutional or "human right" to immigrate to the United States.

Hillary Clinton thinks otherwise--or at least her campaign does.

Shortly after Trump's speech, the Twitter account "Hillary for Ohio" tweeted the following:

The official Hillary Clinton Twitter account retweeted it shortly thereafter.

Embedded in the tweet is a link to the story of Mohamed G. and his family. Mohamed recounts the story of his father's difficult path to stay in the United States:

"My father came to the United States in 1994 on a scholarship as an international student. He wasn’t able to get his permanent residency approved until 2015, leaving our family in limbo for more than two decades. He has a post-Masters’ degree, but for years he had no other choice than to do odd jobs due to his immigration status. The worst part was that for decades he couldn’t visit his family in Libya, even after many of them passed away. If he left the United States to visit relatives in Libya, he would not be allowed back."

Mohamed notes that his father is a good man who started an Islamic organization in Ohio and helped refugees. He adds that there's no way he "could let a person that disrespects my father and other immigrants win the White House."

Interesting story. However, it leaves a lingering question. What does Mohamed's tale have to do with what Trump said about immigration? The answer is that it has nothing to do with what Trump said about immigration. It's a story specifically designed to pull so hard on the heartstrings that logic and reason become irrelevant.

The story doesn't address that fact that, as Trump said, "no one has the right to immigrate to this country." It simply stirs up animosity toward the GOP nominee by portraying him as a villain who might dare to enforce immigration laws.

This "heartstring" tactic is one that's employed by both Democrats and Republicans on various issues. However, it's used predominantly by the Left. When one cannot argue policy, one muddies the water with emotions.