Shaun King, who makes his career as a “social justice” blogger and activist working with the Black Lives Matter movement, decided to write a piece for the New York Daily News in which he laments that despite his blackness, some people have insulted him by calling him white.

That must be confusing.

King writes:

After the conservative media came after me with lies and drama about my race in August, the hate grew so severe, that I had to isolate myself from it. Sadly, many of my friends and family members still see it. Recently, one of my favorite professors from my days at Morehouse College - a historically black school in Atlanta - shared the sheer hilarity of it all when he saw scores of the same racists who called me nigger, now attempting to insult me, by calling me, of all things, white.

I have to admit that it's one of the strangest things I've ever experienced - not only to be called white, but to be called white as an insult, by white people. For me, for my family, my friends, my colleagues, my race has never been an issue. It's only an issue because racists who hate who I am and what I do, need it to be to an issue.

His race has never been an issue for him?

Let’s backtrack for a moment.

In his book “The Power of 100!,” King wrote he had been “harassed almost daily by a growing group of self-proclaimed rednecks” before a mob “started punching him from every angle,” stomping on his “broken body” with “steel-toed boots,” as The Blaze reported. The Daily Caller reported both the police report and the detective on the case stated it was a one-to-one fight. Three statements provided to police indicate the fight arose because a girl allegedly owed King $8 for breaking his CD. The girl said King initially said it was an accident so she didn’t owe him the money, but later accosted her and told her he wanted the cash, prompting a fight with her boyfriend.

Is King’s credibility an issue?

King founded a nonprofit, HopeMob, which, according to Forbes, was designed to “make it easy for people to give to a cause or to people in need.” Yet charges were hurled that the site would not return calls by users asking where their money had gone.

King’s claim of his blackness has been disputed. Although King has claimed his white mother conceived him with a black man, when the Black Conservatives Fund, a black conservative group, offered to pay Black Lives Matter $25,000 if King could prove that his father was black by either producing the man or taking a DNA test, no response was forthcoming. Ali Akbar, a senior adviser for the Black Conservatives Fund, said, “Shaun King has bullied other blacks — conservatives blacks — who don’t share 100% of his political views. I get it. That’s the ugly side of politics. But to steal the identity of a people who are crying out for reform — that’s just fraud.”

"How can we trust anything this man says on any subject when basic facts about his own biography are inconsistent?"

Milo Yiannopoulos

Interviewed by CNN’s Don Lemon, King declined to confirm for him that his father is black.

As Milo Yiannopoulos of Breitbart noted:

How can we trust anything this man says on any subject when basic facts about his own biography are inconsistent? He tweeted once that he was the father to four daughters, and six months later that changed to three daughters. Now, sure, maybe that was a family tragedy, but it’s not the only thing in which he’s inconsistent; it isn’t just his race. He sometimes said he’s had three, sometimes four, sometimes five spinal surgeries. Everything about this man’s life seems to be slightly confusing or questionable or have some sort of fog around it.

King has claimed, “I now receive death threats daily and racist harassment around the clock. While many of my peers may not experience this level of severity, it's only natural for any of us to want some type of way to escape the trauma of what it means to be black in America.”

There’s no telling how much, if any, of what King says or writes is the truth. But if people are calling him white, perhaps that’s not an insult. Perhaps they’re just acknowledging reality.