Not long after New York Mayor Bill De Blasio trashed law enforcement in 2014, two NYPD officers were murdered by a man who wanted to put "wings on pigs." The response from the police: thousands of officers literally turned their backs on the mayor at the officers' funeral. So the question is what kind of treatment is President Obama going to get when he arrives in Dallas on Tuesday? If statements from law enforcement — including a leader in a police union that represents 240,000 officers nationwide — is any indication, the president should plan for the worst.

Thursday, Obama gave a speech in which he repeated misleading statistics about law enforcement's treatment of minorities and condemned the justice system as being plagued by systemic racism. Hours later, five officers were murdered by a man who declared that he "wanted to kill white people, especially white officers." Within 24 hours, several other apparent assassination attempts on officers over racial grievances occurred in other states. President Obama has responded by attempting to downplay the anti-cop, anti-white motives of the Dallas killer, Micah Johnson, and push his gun control and social justice policing agendas as the solution to the war on cops.

The president's response hasn't gone over well with many in the law enforcement community. One of the most vocal critics of Obama in the aftermath of the devastating attack is William Johnson, executive director of the massively influential National Association of Police Organizations, which has around 240,000 members. In a series of interviews, Johnson has pointed directly to the president and his administration for creating the "climate that has made Dallas possible."

"I think [the Obama administration's] continued appeasements at the federal level with the Department of Justice, their appeasement of violent criminals, their refusal to condemn movements like Black Lives Matter, actively calling for the death of police officers, that type of thing, all the while blaming police for the problems in this country has led directly to the climate that has made Dallas possible," said Johnson in an interview with Fox on Friday morning.

"This president and his administration absolutely do not have our back and make our jobs more dangerous."

William Johnson, National Association of Police Organizations

Johnson doubled down on his accusations on Sunday, saying, "The man responsible for the murders [in Dallas] was Micah Johnson, but having said that, I do think the president by his inaction has contributed to a climate where these things can happen. This president and his administration absolutely do not have our back and make our jobs more dangerous."

Former Dallas police officer and Phoenix police chief Daniel Garcia, agrees, citing Obama's repeated failure to act in an unbiased way after racially charged situations.

"The right words would’ve gone a long way to quell both sides of this issue," said Mr. Garcia, according to the Wall Street Journal. "Do we have racial issues that need to be addressed? Absolutely. Were some of these shootings controversial and didn’t look good? Yes. But again, you can’t just jump to one side and say this side is right."

Williams' and Garcia's complaints point to a pattern by the president of dangerously connecting high-profile police-involved shootings with racism before any concrete evidence of racial motivation is ascertained. To make matters worse, Obama has consistently turned out to be wrong in assigning the blame for shootings to racial bias among cops, something he has tried to sidestep by pointing to alleged "systemic racism," both "conscious and unconscious" in the justice system.

The most notorious examples of Obama's reckless fanning of the racial flames in the wake of an attack include his racially charged response to the shooting of black teenager Michael Brown by white officer Darren Wilson (who was completely exonerated of all wrongdoing by Obama's own Department of Justice), his connection of the death of Freddie Gray to racially motivated crimes (all of the officers involved that have been tried so far have been cleared), his "stupid" lecture to the Massachusetts police for arresting famous African-American scholar Henry Louis Gates, and, most recently, his willful insertion of race into the shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, which are still under investigation.

Obama is speaking at the interfaith memorial service to honor the five murdered officers Tuesday at the invitation of the Dallas mayor.