German authorities discovered "weapons of war" during a raid close to a radical mosque, yet another instance of the failure of gun control.

The stockpile was found by a SWAT team in Nordrhein-Westfalen, or North Rhine-Westphalia, inside "a cold room of a greengrocer," according the UK Express.

The raid was brought to light by Ismail Tipi, member of the Hessian parliament and of the Christian Democratic Union, who took the occasion to warn about radical Islam.

"According to my information, a weapons arsenal with war grade weapons was found in this search," Tipi said. "The danger of fundamentalist Salafists who are ready to use violence arming themselves in Germany is very large. This secret raid finding this weapons cache makes this more than clear."

Salafism, which is the extreme Sunni Islamic philosophy that aims "to define the new order according to seventh-century religious traditions rather than earthly realities," according to The New York Times's Robin Wright, is the ideology that guides ISIS. There has been an increase from 7,000 Salafi supporters in 2014 to 8,900 today.

"The fear is large that Salafist sleeper cells, jihadis, and get support from foreign intelligence services that are not friendly to us," Tipi continued. "Through the weapons arsenal, the sleeper cells and militant jihadis can be armed with weapons and prepare for their likely attack. This is exactly what I have always feared. Politicians must speak clearly about this."

According to the Library of Congress, "Germany has one of the most stringent gun control laws in the world," via Townhall:

The current Weapons Act deals with guns suitable for private ownership. It contains a highly differentiated regime for licensing the acquisition, possession, and carrying of permitted weapons that restricts, according to criteria of need, the number and types of guns that can be owned or purchased, and has specific age restrictions for different types of weapons. The Act bans automatic firearms, regulates the production of and trade in weapons, and has reporting requirements that allow the tracing of every legally owned firearm, including those acquired through inheritance. Moreover, the Act contains stringent and enforceable requirements for the safe storage of guns. The Act is implemented by the administrative authorities of the states, except for the newly created National Weapons Register, which is a federal agency.

Germany also bans semiautomatic weapons that aren't used "for hunting or sport shooting" as well as "pump-action shotguns with pistol grips or of a short overall length; firearms that are concealed in other objects; firearms that can be disassembled into unusually small parts; lasers, lights, projectors, and night-vision devices that can be mounted on the firearm to throw light on the target; and certain multiple-shot short arms in calibers under 6.3 millimeters, where the projectiles are not propelled solely by the priming charge."

"The fear is large that Salafist sleeper cells, jihadis, and ISIS terrorists in Germany get support from foreign intelligence services that are not friendly to us."

Ismail Tipi, member of the Hessian parliament and of the Christian Democratic Union

The country also has strict laws about how gun owners are supposed to store firearms to the point where they have to report their storage methods to the authorities and be subject to searches by the authorities at any time without a search warrant.

In other words, even the myriad of Germany's burdensome gun laws didn't prevent radical Islamists from obtaining weapons of war. Democratic politicians in America should take note.