After a heart-wrenching week of meeting with Floridians whose lives were devastated by the horrific Orlando terror attack, Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) made no bones about his opinion of the way President Obama and his administration was responding to the threat of radical Islam.

"At some point," said Scott, "we're going to get a president that is going to say, 'I care about destroying ISIS.'"

Scott's comments came in response to Attorney General Loretta Lynch announcing Sunday that her department was going to release the transcript of Orlando jihadist Omar Mateen's 911 call, but with all references to radical Islam and ISIS edited out.

"At some point, we're going to get a president that is going to say, 'I care about destroying ISIS.'"

Florida Gov. Rick Scott

The absurd, Orwellian move rightly earned Lynch and her DOJ a growing chorus of criticism. Shortly after the edited transcript was released Monday, the administration caved to the public shaming and posted the unedited version. Instead of deemphasizing the terrorists ISIS and radical Islamic propaganda, all Lynch succeeded in doing was underscoring it and proving that the edit was a purely political move.

Asked about what he thought about the administration's attempt to erase "radical Islam" and "ISIS" from the record, Scott connected the move to Obama's failure to effectively respond to the threat of radical Islamic terror.

"This seems like this is another example of not focusing on the evil here. It’s evil. It’s ISIS. It’s radical Islam," Scott told Fox News Sunday from Orlando.

"At some point we are going to get a president that is going to say, ‘You know, I care about destroying ISIS,'" said Scott. "For everyone that's a [victim] of this ... I want a focus on how do we get rid of ISIS. How do we stop this? How do we stop radical Islam?"

"This is wrong," he added. "It’s hurting our country. This is an attack on our gay community, our Hispanic community but our entire nation."

Asked what he thought Lynch meant by claiming she doesn't want to "re-victimize" those who have suffered, Scott said, "I have no idea what she means."

"But I can tell you what: I have gone to funerals, I’ve sat down and cried with the parents," he added. "I’ve gone and visited individuals in the hospitals. They are grieving. Now, they want answers. If it was my family I would want answers. We all would like answers."

Lynch, said Scott, should "release everything," which she did to much humiliation Monday afternoon. The reluctance to name the enemy and distract from the clear evidence, the governor suggested, was more indication that the Obama administration has still failed to "get serious about destroying ISIS."

The administration's quick reversal on the edited transcript (which still replaces all reference to "Allah" with "God"), proved that there was no investigative reason to try to hide the terrorist's pledges of allegiance, proving Scott and others, right that the Obama and Lynch were playing ideological games with the facts of an attack that left 49 innocent people dead and 53 others wounded.

When they released the unedited versions, the DOJ and FBI released a joint statement dismissing the whole thing as an "unnecessary distraction."

"Unfortunately, the unreleased portions of the transcript that named the terrorist organizations and leaders have caused an unnecessary distraction from the hard work that the FBI and our law enforcement partners have been doing to investigate this heinous crime," they said.

Meanwhile, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Monday that none of it was Obama's fault.