A new study from the UK, found in Infant and Child Development: An International Journal of Research, reveals that infants have an innate inclination for toys which “match” their biological gender.

The researchers concluded that their findings, “though they come with caveats, appear to support the notion that boys and girls display gender-typed preferences before they are old enough to be aware of gender and even in the absence of their parents, who might otherwise influence them to play in a gender-stereotyped fashion,” reports Research Digest.

Dr. Brenda Todd and her team of researchers tested over 100 infants at four “multicultural” nurseries within London, 47 girls and 54 boys ranging from nine to 32 months old.

The infants were tested in a quiet area away from other children, “surrounded in a semi-circle by seven toys identified in a local survey as being stereotypically male (a car, a blue teddy, a digger, a ball) or stereotypically female (a doll, a pink teddy, a cooking pot). The toys were placed in a random order within reach of the child, who was encouraged by the researcher to ‘play with any of the toys that you want to.’”

For three minutes the researchers noted every move the infants made with the toys: which they played with, deliberately touched or moved every five seconds.

“The researchers divided the children into three age groups: 9-17 months, 18-23 months, and 24-32 months,” notes Research Digest. “At every age, there was a clear pattern – boys showed more interest in and played for longer with male-type toys and girls showed a similar bias for female-typed toys.”

“At every age, there was a clear pattern – boys showed more interest in and played for longer with male-type toys and girls showed a similar bias for female-typed toys.”

-Research Digest

The researchers also came across another finding, this one somewhat bizarre. While boys were more inclined to choose “boy” toys the older they were, girls’ inclinations for “girl” toys declined somewhat with age: “[A]s the boys grew older they showed an even stronger preference for male toys, whereas girls started out with a very strong preference for female toys which diminished to a ‘merely strong’ preference in the older age group.”

Lending more credence to the study, the researchers involved were not beholden to a specific agenda based on gender politics. Their goal was to observe the differences between the sexes out “of interest in relation to child care, educational practice and developmental theory.”

It's undeniable that these findings fly right in the face of the feminist notion that gender is merely a “social construct,” that “gender matched” leanings are not innate or inherent. For instance, feminist writer Kate Millet claims that the differences between the male and female genders are “the sum total of the parents', the peers', and the culture's notions of what is appropriate to each gender by way of temperament, character, interests, status, worth, gesture, and expression.” In other words, people become women or men based on societal factors and not biology.

All though this study is not exactly the be-all and end-all, it's fair to say that this feminist ideology, which has been shoved into overdrive recently to push the Left's trans agenda, has some serious flaws.