In a piece appearing on Lena Dunham’s website, LennyLetters.com, titled “Is This The Ultrasound Generation?”, writer Mattie Kahn desperately tries to allay the fears of abortion advocates worried that seeing ultrasounds of their babies in the womb will catalyze mothers to eschew killing their babies.

It is no small fact that as Lifenews states, “Former abortionists, for example, abandoned the gruesome practice in droves when ultrasound technology was introduced into their abortion businesses and they became, perhaps for the first time, painfully cognizant of the barbarity of the act they inflicted on innumerable children.”

As Howard Slugh noted in National Review in 2015, “One of the most profound pro-life moments of 2014 came at the hands of an unborn child whose 'thumbs-up' bore a striking resemblance to the trademark gesture of Arthur 'Fonzie' Fonzarelli. A photo of the ultrasound went viral and inspired mothers to share images of their own unborn children.”

Slugh continued, “Ultrasounds, and other improving technologies, can help the pro-life movement persuade previously unreachable individuals. Despite their public denials, pro-choice organizations understand this, and in fact have conceded the point in lawsuits challenging mandatory ultrasound laws.”

Kahn mocks the millions who were moved by the ultrasound of the “Fonzie” child, writing, “At 18 weeks, the Fonz was as adorable as the contents of a gray-scaled amniotic sac can be.” Quoting Ashley McGuire, a senior fellow at the Catholic Association, who asserted, "[T]he pro-life movement is growing younger and stronger," Kahn attempts to dismiss that claim, citing the “most recent data” that says 55% of millennials think abortion should be legal in all or most cases, a statistic that dovetails with a 2014 Pew report finding 56% of Americans between the ages of 18 and 32 think widespread abortion access should be permitted.

Of course, Kahn ignored an even more recent poll from CNN, which found that 58% of Americans believe abortion “should be illegal in most” circumstances.Kahn turns to Dr. Katrina Kimport, a faculty member at the University of California–San Francisco, who “studied over 15,000 abortion visits over the course of one year. For the 85 percent of women who said they were ‘highly certain’ abortion was the best decision for them, Kimport found that the choice to view the ultrasound had no impact on their plans to terminate.” Kimport adds, "So what does that tell us? That tells us that for people who are unsure, this may be part of how they make a decision … Women make abortion decisions in relationship to the circumstances of their lives. And what you see on a screen is not going to change your financial situation. It's not going to change or reduce the needs of your existing children. It's not going to make a partner supportive or stop him from being abusive. The visualization on the screen doesn't change the reasons that make women seek abortions in the first place."

“At 18 weeks, the Fonz was as adorable as the contents of a gray-scaled amniotic sac can be.”

Mattie Kahn, mocking the viral ultrasound of an unborn child

The very fact that the nation’s leading abortion provider, Planned Parenthood, has vigorously opposed ultrasounds should tell you all you need to know; as former Planned Parenthood worker Catherine Anthony Adair stated, “We never discussed fetal development. The baby was referred to as the ‘contents of the uterus’ or a ‘clump of cells.’ On the rare occasion a woman asked about the size of the baby, I would tell her it was about the size of the tip of my pencil, regardless of how many weeks into her pregnancy she was."

Kahn huffs, “Advocates will tell you that ultrasounds are facts. They tell the truth — that fetuses are babies, that cells grow into people.” She then writes, “But an ultrasound is not incontrovertible truth, Kimport explains. The circumstances that drive a woman to seek an abortion dictate how she sees it, scrutinizes it, makes sense of it.”