Some Republicans who are vehemently opposed to real estate mogul Donald Trump tried unsuccessfully to recruit a shocking but well-known name to run third-party: Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban.

According to The Washington Post, these group of Republicans–which include radio host Erick Erickson, The Weekly Standard founder and editor Bill Kristol and Republican strategists Rick Wilson and Mike Murphy–attempted to recruit Cuban because they felt like he had the personality that could establish an emotional connection with voters like Trump. Cuban thought that he could effectively counter-punch any attack Trump throws his way.

"All that said, again, I don’t see it happening," Cuban said. "There isn’t enough time."

Earlier in the primary, Cuban said that he would not be able to vote for Trump.

"Before all the presidential stuff, he was like that friend everybody had that you liked to pick on," Cuban said in an appearance on CBS's The Late Late Show with James Corden. "In person, he's nice. But now, he's gone crazy. I can't explain what's happened to him."

While Cuban thought that a businessman would be an effective president and respected that Trump freely shares what's on his mind without worrying about political correctness, he had his doubts about Trump.

"I told him I don't agree with 90% of what you say," Cuban said. "I wouldn't vote for him with what he's saying right now."

In an interview with Business Insider, Cuban said that he is registered as an Independent, but would be a Republican if not for the fact that the party is "too rigid."

"I'm a Republican in the respect that I like smaller government and I like less intrusion in some areas," Cuban said. "But there's sometimes where I think we have to intrude. I think there's sometimes when you have to do things."

Cuban was also critical of the left's penchant for expanding government.

"You can't cure every ill with a government program," Cuban said. "I literally would rather write a check: Take whatever money is in a given department in the government, take 25 percent off the top, put it back in the taxpayers' pockets, and then just give cash to people, right? Because it'll be more effective in how it's used and help the economy at the same time."

Cuban also expressed in the interview that he has no desire to run for public office because he's "not a consensus builder."

"I'm like, 'This is the way we need to do it. Let's go do it,'" Cuban said. "And that doesn't work real well in politics."

The anti-Trump Republicans have considered numerous other possibilities for a third-party candidate other than Cuban, who have included Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE), Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R), former Sen. Tom Coburn (R-OK), former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice and retired Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal.